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AI & SOCIETY

, Volume 33, Issue 4, pp 537–543 | Cite as

The problem of self in Nāgārjuna’s philosophy: a contemporary perspective

  • Rajakishore NathEmail author
Open Forum
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Abstract

In this paper, I would like to examine Nāgārjuna’s idea of the self and its contemporaneity interpretations in philosophy. As we know, Nāgārjuna examines the emptiness (Śūnyatā) of various things in which the emptiness of the self occupies an important position in the Buddhist philosophical tradition. The main aim of this paper is to understand the meaning of emptiness to explain the nature of the self and to show how it is different from the substantial notion of self. However, Nāgārjuna’s idea of the self is not identical with the contemporary materialistic notion of self. The paper is divided into five sections. In the first section, I would like to explain the nature of emptiness in relation to self and how it is different from the substantial self. The second section will focus on the constituents of the self. The third section will bring out the nature of self. In the fourth section and last section, I would like to bring out Nāgārjuna’s idea of the emptiness of the self with respect to the contemporary debates on the nature of self.

Keywords

Self No Self Substantial Self Narrative Self Svabhāva Emptiness (Śūnyatā

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Humanities and Social SciencesIndian Institute of Technology BombayMumbaiIndia

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