AI & SOCIETY

, 24:97 | Cite as

Designing convivial digital cities: a social intelligence design approach

Original Article

Abstract

Conviviality has been identified as a key concept necessary to web communities, such as digital cities, and while it has been simultaneously defined in literature as individual freedom realized in personal interdependence, rational and cooperative behavior and normative instrument, no model for conviviality has yet been proposed for computer science. In this article, we raised the question whether social intelligence design could be used to designing convivial digital cities. We first looked at digital cities and identified, from a social intelligence design point of view, two main categories of digital cities: public websites and commercial websites; we also noted the experimental qualities of digital cities. Second, we analyzed the concept of conviviality for social science, multi-agent systems and intelligent interface; we showed the distinction among various kinds of use of conviviality, the positive outcomes such as social cohesion, trust and participation but also the negative aspects that emerged when conviviality became an instrument of power relations. Fourth, we looked at the normative aspect of conviviality as described in the literature and found that social norms for conviviality paralleled legal and institutional norms for digital cities. Finally, as a first step toward obtaining measures for conviviality, we presented a case study describing agents and user’s interactions using dependence graphs. We also presented an analysis of conviviality requirements and described our plan and methodology for designing convivial digital cities.

Notes

Acknowledgments

We thank the city of Luxembourg for their financial support. This work was first presented at SID 07 and is a revised and extended version of COIN paper (Caire 2008).

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Computer Science and CommunicationLuxembourg UniversityLuxembourg CityLuxembourg

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