AI & SOCIETY

, Volume 23, Issue 2, pp 309–325 | Cite as

Self-efficacy and learning experience of information education: in case of junior high school

  • Jun Moriyama
  • Yasushi Kato
  • Yoshika Aoki
  • Akihito Kito
  • Maryam Behnoodi
  • Youichi Miyagawa
  • Masashi Matsuura
Open Forum

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to make clear the relationships between student’s self-efficacy and learning experience of information education in case of junior high school. Two investigations were implemented in this study. The aim of first investigation was to grasp the present status of students’ feeling of effectiveness of their learning experience in information education. Also, the aim of second investigation was to verify the relationships between students’ self-efficacy and the abilities for information utilizing that promoted in information education. The first investigation with a question: “What kind of a learning experience do you feel is useful in your life?” was conducted on 426 junior high school students. As a result, almost half of the students feel effectiveness of gaining computer-operating skills in “Information and Computer” class. Also, it is suggested that utilization of Internet could promote the feeling of effectiveness in current daily lives. In second investigation, the relationship between self-efficacy and abilities for information utilizing was examined by using multi-regression analysis on 544 junior high school students. As a result, abilities for information utilizing were affected from self-evaluation of “social position of abilities” and “positive attitude to activities” in self-efficacy. Also, self-efficacy was affected from “processing ability of information” and “creation ability of information” in abilities for information utilizing. By the results of these investigations, it is suggested that these two factors are formed as a gradual cycle which promote each other. From these results, some suggestions for improvement of classroom activities in information education were proposed.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jun Moriyama
    • 1
  • Yasushi Kato
    • 1
  • Yoshika Aoki
    • 1
  • Akihito Kito
    • 1
  • Maryam Behnoodi
    • 1
  • Youichi Miyagawa
    • 1
  • Masashi Matsuura
    • 1
  1. 1.Hyogo University of Teacher EducationKato CityJapan

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