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Topology-Hiding Computation on All Graphs

  • Adi Akavia
  • Rio LaVigneEmail author
  • Tal Moran
Article
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Abstract

A distributed computation in which nodes are connected by a partial communication graph is called topology hiding if it does not reveal information about the graph beyond what is revealed by the output of the function. Previous results have shown that topology-hiding computation protocols exist for graphs of constant degree and logarithmic diameter in the number of nodes (Moran–Orlov–Richelson, TCC’15; Hirt et al., Crypto’16) as well as for other graph families, such as cycles, trees, and low circumference graphs (Akavia–Moran, Eurocrypt’17), but the feasibility question for general graphs was open. In this work, we positively resolve the above open problem: we prove that topology-hiding computation is feasible for all graphs under either the decisional Diffie–Hellman or quadratic residuosity assumption. Our techniques employ random or deterministic walks to generate paths covering the graph, upon which we apply the Akavia–Moran topology-hiding broadcast for chain graphs (paths). To prevent topology information revealed by the random walk, we design multiple graph-covering sequences that, together, are locally identical to receiving at each round a message from each neighbor and sending back a processed message from some neighbor (in a randomly permuted order).

Keywords

Secure Multiparty Computation Topology-Hiding computation Random walks Networks Broadcast 

Notes

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Copyright information

© International Association for Cryptologic Research 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of HaifaHaifaIsrael
  2. 2.MITCambridgeUSA
  3. 3.IDC HerzliyaHerzliyaIsrael

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