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Intensive Care Medicine

, Volume 27, Issue 8, pp 1305–1311 | Cite as

Time-dependency of sensory evoked potentials in comatose cardiac arrest survivors

  • Alexandra Gendo
  • Ludwig Kramer
  • Michael Häfner
  • Georg-Christian Funk
  • Christian Zauner
  • Fritz Sterz
  • Michael Holzer
  • Edith Bauer
  • Christian Madl
Original article

Abstract.

Objective: To assess the validity of early sensory evoked potential (SEP) recording for reliable outcome prediction in comatose cardiac arrest survivors within 48 h after restoration of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Design and setting: Prospective cohort study in a medical intensive care unit of a university hospital. Patients: Twenty-five comatose, mechanically ventilated patients following cardiopulmonary resuscitation Measurements and results: Median nerve short- and long-latency SEP were recorded 4, 12, 24, and 48 h after ROSC. Cortical N20 peak latency and cervicomedullary conduction time decreased (improved) significantly between 4, 12, and 24 h after resuscitation in 22 of the enrolled patients. There was no further change in short-latency SEP at 48 h. The cortical N70 peak was initially detectable in seven patients. The number of patients with increased N70 peak increased to 11 at 12 h and 14 at 24 h; there was no further change at 48 h. Specificity of the N70 peak latency (critical cutoff 130 ms) increased from 0.43 at 4 h to 1.0 at 24 h after ROSC. Sensitivity decreased from 1.0 at 4 h to 0.83 at 24 h after ROSC. Conclusion: Within 24 h after ROSC there was a significant improvement in SEP. Therefore we recommend allowing a period of at least 24 h after cardiopulmonary resuscitation for obtaining a reliable prognosis based on SEP.

Sensory evoked potentials Cardiopulmonary resuscitation Postischemic metabolic and circulatory derangements Outcome prediction 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alexandra Gendo
    • 1
  • Ludwig Kramer
    • 1
  • Michael Häfner
    • 1
  • Georg-Christian Funk
    • 1
  • Christian Zauner
    • 1
  • Fritz Sterz
    • 2
  • Michael Holzer
    • 2
  • Edith Bauer
    • 1
  • Christian Madl
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Internal Medicine IV, Intensive Care Unit 13 H1, University of Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, 1090 ViennaAustria
  2. 2.Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, 1090 ViennaAustria

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