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Intensive Care Medicine

, Volume 44, Issue 8, pp 1355–1356 | Cite as

Psychopathology prior to critical illness and the risk of delirium onset during intensive care unit stay

  • Ayesha Sajjad
  • Annemiek E. Wolters
  • Dieuwke S. Veldhuijzen
  • Linda M. Peelen
  • Maartje C. Welling
  • Irene J. Zaal
  • Diederik van Dijk
  • Arjen J. C. Slooter
Letter

Dear Editor,

During an intensive care unit (ICU) stay, delirium is a common and serious medical problem, as it is associated with short-term and long-term morbidity [1]. Delirium in critically ill patients has a multifactorial pathogenesis, but the pathophysiology is still largely unknown [2]. One of the presumed predisposing factors for delirium is a history of psychopathology prior to hospital admission [3]. In patients who underwent elective major non-cardiac surgery, depression and psychotropic drug use prior to surgery were important predictors for the occurrence of postoperative delirium [3]. However, not all studies could demonstrate consistent results and were limited to postoperative and/or cardiac care patients [4]. Therefore, we aimed to investigate whether psychopathology prior to hospital admission predisposes critically ill patients to delirium during ICU stay for all admissions.

We analyzed data on patients who were admitted for at least 24 h to a tertiary mixed medical...

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors thank Dr. Hillegers (Psychiatrist at the Department of Psychiatry, University Medical Centre Utrecht) for her help and support in classifying the patients’ psychopathology. We also thank W. Pasma, DVM (Department of Intensive Care Medicine, University Medical Centre Utrecht) and the research nurses of the trial office (Department of Intensive Care Medicine, University Medical Centre Utrecht) for their support in data acquisition and data management.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflicts of interest

All authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical approval

The Medical Research Ethics Committee of the University Medical Centre Utrecht waived the need for informed consent (protocols 12/421 and 10/056) for this study.

Supplementary material

134_2018_5195_MOESM1_ESM.docx (103 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 103 kb)

References

  1. 1.
    Pandharipande PP, Girard TD, Jackson JC et al (2013) Long-term cognitive impairment after critical illness. N Engl J Med 369(14):1306–1316CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Zaal IJ, Devlin JW, Peelen LM et al (2015) A systematic review of risk factors for delirium in the ICU. Crit Care Med 43:40–47CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Dasgupta M, Dumbrell AC (2006) Preoperative risk assessment for delirium after noncardiac surgery: a systematic review. J Am Geriatr Soc 54:1578–1589CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Gosselt AN, Slooter AJ, Boere PR et al (2015) Risk factors for delirium after on-pump cardiac surgery: a systematic review. Crit Care 19:346CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Zaal IJ, Tekatli H, van der Kooi AW et al (2015) Classification of daily mental status in critically ill patients for research purposes. J Crit Care 30:375–380CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature and ESICM 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ayesha Sajjad
    • 1
  • Annemiek E. Wolters
    • 1
  • Dieuwke S. Veldhuijzen
    • 2
  • Linda M. Peelen
    • 1
    • 3
  • Maartje C. Welling
    • 1
  • Irene J. Zaal
    • 1
  • Diederik van Dijk
    • 1
    • 4
  • Arjen J. C. Slooter
    • 1
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Intensive Care MedicineUniversity Medical Centre UtrechtUtrechtThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Institute of Psychology, Health Medical and Neuropsychology UnitLeiden Institute for Brain and Cognition, Leiden UniversityLeidenThe Netherlands
  3. 3.Department of Epidemiology, Julius Centre for Health Sciences and Primary CareUniversity Medical Centre UtrechtUtrechtThe Netherlands
  4. 4.Brain Center Rudolf MagnusUtrecht UniversityUtrechtThe Netherlands

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