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Intensive Care Medicine

, Volume 43, Issue 2, pp 279–281 | Cite as

Invasive meningococcal disease-induced myocarditis in critically ill adult patients: initial presentation and long-term outcome

  • Thomas Madelaine
  • Martin Cour
  • Julien Bohé
  • Bernard Floccard
  • Serge Duperret
  • Romain Hernu
  • Laurent Argaud
Letter

Myocarditis lesions have been found in up to three-quarters of children and young adults dying from invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) with histopathological examinations identifying Neisseria meningitidis in the injured myocardium [1, 2]. These features strongly differ from the usual septic cardiomyopathy, in which neither myocardial necrosis nor the presence of bacteria in the heart are observed [3]. Because the clinical data on IMD-induced myocarditis remain scarce, we aimed to describe the initial presentation and long-term outcome of IMD-induced myocarditis in critically ill adult patients.

We conducted a 12-year observational, retrospective, multicentric study in four French academic intensive care units (ICUs). The study received approval from our institutional review board. IMD was diagnosed in adults (>16 years old) when Neisseria meningitidiswas isolated from usually sterile fluids or tissues. Myocarditis diagnosis was retained, according to the position statement of the...

Keywords

Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction Myocarditis Myocardial Necrosis Neisseria Meningitidis Elevated Troponin 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Funding

None.

Conflicts of interest

The authors declare they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of our institutional research committee and with the 1964 Declaration of Helsinki and its later amendments. For this type of study formal consent was not required.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg and ESICM 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas Madelaine
    • 1
    • 2
  • Martin Cour
    • 1
    • 2
  • Julien Bohé
    • 3
  • Bernard Floccard
    • 4
  • Serge Duperret
    • 5
  • Romain Hernu
    • 1
  • Laurent Argaud
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Service de Réanimation MédicaleHospices Civils de Lyon, Hôpital Edouard HerriotLyonFrance
  2. 2.Faculté de Médecine Lyon-EstUniversité de Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1LyonFrance
  3. 3.Service de Réanimation Médico-chirurgicaleHospices Civils de Lyon, Groupement Hospitalier Lyon-SudPierre-BéniteFrance
  4. 4.Service de Réanimation ChirurgicaleHospices Civils de Lyon, Hôpital Edouard HerriotLyonFrance
  5. 5.Service de Réanimation ChirurgicaleHospices Civils de Lyon, Groupement Hospitalier Nord, Hôpital de Croix-RousseLyonFrance

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