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Intensive Care Medicine

, Volume 41, Issue 9, pp 1716–1718 | Cite as

Pneumocystis jirovecii airborne transmission between critically ill patients and health care workers

  • Sandrine Valade
  • Elie AzoulayEmail author
  • Céline Damiani
  • Francis Derouin
  • Anne Totet
  • Jean Menotti
Letter

Dear Editor,

Airborne transmission of Pneumocystis between immunocompromised and immunocompetent hosts has been demonstrated in animal models [1]. In humans, colonization with P. jirovecii has been identified in immunocompromised and immunocompetent individuals [2]. The role of colonized people is still unclear, but a recent study provided arguments for colonized patients to be potential sources of nosocomial acquisition of Pneumocystis [3].

This prospective study was conducted between January and October 2012 to assess the implication of Pneumocystis-colonized subjects in Pneumocystis transmission (study design described in Supplementary Figure). Health care workers (HCW) were defined as “contact” if they stayed more than 5 min and less than 2 m from an infected patient. P. jirovecii DNA was detected by nasal swab and/or oropharyngeal wash as previously described [4]. Air samples were performed by using a liquid cyclone-style air sampling device (Coriolis µ®, Bertin) as previously...

Keywords

Internal Transcribe Space Health Care Worker Nasal Swab Fungal Burden Pneumocystis Jirovecii 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported in part by the Agence Nationale de Sécurité Sanitaire de l’Alimentation, de l’Environnement et du Travail (grant nr. EST-2011/1/053) and by the Institut de Médecine et d’Epidémiologie Appliquée.

Conflicts of interest

The authors report no conflicts of interest.

Supplementary material

134_2015_3835_MOESM1_ESM.tif (153 kb)
Supplementary Fig. 1. Study design and results (TIF 154 KB)

References

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    Le Gal S, Damiani C, Rouillé A, Grall A, Tréguer L, Virmaux M et al (2012) A cluster of Pneumocystis infections among renal transplant recipients: molecular evidence of colonized patients as potential infectious sources of Pneumocystis jirovecii. Clin Infect Dis 54:62–71CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Choukri F, Menotti J, Sarfati C, Lucet J-C, Nevez G, Garin YJF et al (2010) Quantification and spread of Pneumocystis jirovecii in the surrounding air of patients with Pneumocystis pneumonia. Clin Infect Dis 51:259–265CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
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    Damiani C, Choukri F, Le Gal S, Menotti J, Sarfati C, Nevez G et al (2012) Possible nosocomial transmission of Pneumocystis jirovecii. Emerg Infect Dis 18:877–878PubMedCentralCrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg and ESICM 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sandrine Valade
    • 1
    • 2
  • Elie Azoulay
    • 1
    Email author
  • Céline Damiani
    • 3
  • Francis Derouin
    • 2
    • 4
  • Anne Totet
    • 3
  • Jean Menotti
    • 2
    • 4
  1. 1.Medical Intensive Care Unit, Hôpital Saint-Louis, ECSTRA Team, Biostatistics and Clinical EpidemiologyUMR 1153 (Center of Epidemiology and Biostatistic Sorbonne Paris Cité, CRESS), INSERM, Paris Diderot Sorbonne UniversityParisFrance
  2. 2.Paris Diderot University, Sorbonne Paris CitéParisFrance
  3. 3.Laboratory of Parasitology-MycologyAmiens University Hospital and University of PicardieAmiensFrance
  4. 4.Laboratory of Parasitology-MycologySaint Louis Teaching Hospital, Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de ParisParisFrance

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