Intensive Care Medicine

, Volume 37, Issue 5, pp 847–852

Reduced intubation rates for infants after introduction of high-flow nasal prong oxygen delivery

  • A. Schibler
  • T. M. T. Pham
  • K. R. Dunster
  • K. Foster
  • A. Barlow
  • K. Gibbons
  • J. L. Hough
Pediatric Original

DOI: 10.1007/s00134-011-2177-5

Cite this article as:
Schibler, A., Pham, T.M.T., Dunster, K.R. et al. Intensive Care Med (2011) 37: 847. doi:10.1007/s00134-011-2177-5

Abstract

Purpose

To describe the change in ventilatory practice in a tertiary paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) in the 5-year period after the introduction of high-flow nasal prong (HFNP) therapy in infants <24 months of age. Additionally, to identify the patient subgroups on HFNP requiring escalation of therapy to either other non-invasive or invasive ventilation, and to identify any adverse events associated with HFNP therapy.

Methods

The study was a retrospective chart review of infants <24 months of age admitted to our PICU for HFNP therapy. Data was also extracted from both the local database and the Australian New Zealand paediatric intensive care (ANZPIC) registry for all infants admitted with bronchiolitis.

Results

Between January 2005 and December 2009, a total of 298 infants <24 months of age received HFNP therapy. Overall, 36 infants (12%) required escalation to invasive ventilation. In the subgroup with a primary diagnosis of viral bronchiolitis (n = 167, 56%), only 6 (4%) required escalation to invasive ventilation. The rate of intubation in infants with viral bronchiolitis reduced from 37% to 7% over the observation period corresponding with an increase in the use of HFNP therapy. No adverse events were identified with the use of HFNP therapy.

Conclusion

HFNP therapy has dramatically changed ventilatory practice in infants <24 months of age in our institution, and appears to reduce the need for intubation in infants with viral bronchiolitis.

Keywords

High-flow nasal cannula Oxygen delivery Infant 

Copyright information

© Copyright jointly held by Springer and ESICM 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Schibler
    • 1
  • T. M. T. Pham
    • 1
  • K. R. Dunster
    • 1
  • K. Foster
    • 2
  • A. Barlow
    • 2
  • K. Gibbons
    • 3
  • J. L. Hough
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Paediatric Critical Care Research Group, Paediatric Intensive Care UnitMater Health ServicesSouth BrisbaneAustralia
  2. 2.Paediatric Intensive Care UnitMater Health ServicesSouth BrisbaneAustralia
  3. 3.Mater Medical Research InstituteMater Health ServicesSouth BrisbaneAustralia

Personalised recommendations