Advertisement

Improvement of early diagnosed post-anoxic myoclonus with levetiracetam

  • 618 Accesses

  • 3 Citations

This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access.

Access options

Buy single article

Instant unlimited access to the full article PDF.

US$ 39.95

Price includes VAT for USA

References

  1. 1.

    Lance JW (1986) Action myoclonus, Ramsay Hunt syndrome, and other cerebellar myoclonic syndromes. Adv Neurol 43:33–55

  2. 2.

    Genton P, Gelisse P (2001) Suppression of post-hypoxic and post-encephalitic myoclonus with levetiracetam. Neurology 57:1144–1145

  3. 3.

    Krauss GL, Bergin A, Kramer RE, Cho YW, Reich SG (2001) Suppression of post-hypoxic and post-encephalitic myoclonus with levetiracetam. Neurology 56:411–412

  4. 4.

    Wijdicks EF, Hijdra A, Young GB, Bassetti CL, Wiebe S (2006) Practice parameter: prediction of outcome in comatose survivors after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (an evidence-based review): report of the Quality Standards Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology. Neurology 67:203–210

  5. 5.

    Rossetti AO, Oddo M, Liaudet L, Kaplan PW (2009) Predictors of awakening from postanoxic status epilepticus after therapeutic hypothermia. Neurology 72:744–749

  6. 6.

    Rossetti AO, Oddo M, Logroscino G, Kaplan PW (2010) Prognostication after cardiac arrest and hypothermia, a prospective study. Ann Neurol 67:301–307

  7. 7.

    Al Thenayan E, Savard M, Sharpe M, Norton L, Young B (2008) Predictors of poor neurologic outcome after induced mild hypothermia following cardiac arrest. Neurology 71:1535–1537

  8. 8.

    Lee CY, Chen CC, Liou HH (2009) Levetiracetam inhibits glutamate transmission through presynaptic P/Q-type calcium channels on the granule cells of the dentate gyrus. Br J Pharmacol 158:1753–1762

Download references

Conflict of interest

None.

Author information

Correspondence to Nicolas Weiss.

Electronic supplementary material

Below is the link to the electronic supplementary material.

VIDEO 1 On day 12, before the treatment with levetiracetam began, the patient presented wide myoclonus of the four limbs and trunks. Sitting down in his bed was impossible for him. Absent at rest, myoclonus became apparent during movements while trying to reach the physician’s hand. On day 16, 3 days after the treatment began, the neurological status had mildly improved. There was less myoclonus but voluntary movements were still difficult; the patient was unable to pick up the hammer on the table. On day 19, after 7 days of treatment, the patient was able to sit in the chair. Myoclonus had almost disappeared and he could perform precise voluntary movements (3GP 690 kb)

VIDEO 2 On day 20, before the treatment with levetiracetam began, the patient presented wide myoclonus of the limbs and the head that were triggered by external stimuli. She did not obey commands. On day 22, 2 days after the treatment began, myoclonus was less intense. She was able to obey commands and sit in the chair. Two months after intensive care unit discharge, she had preserved mental function and obeyed commands. There were no abnormal movements at rest, but during voluntary movements, she presented residual myoclonus of the lower limbs that did not allow walking (3GP 388 kb)

Figure: Cerebral MRI of patient 2 at the end of the first month and two months later. Initial MRI performed at the end of the first month: (A) Axial diffusion-weighted sequence at b1000 shows no signal abnormality; (B) Coronal fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequence shows bilateral cortical and subcortical asymmetric hypersignals in the temporal and frontal lobes; (C) Sagittal T1-weighted sequence shows cortical and subcortical hyposignals in the parietal, occipital and frontal regions in the regions where hypersignals are located on the T2 weighted sequence (see D); (D) Axial T2-weighted sequence shows bilateral cortical and subcortical asymmetric hypersignals in the right frontal and both parietal lobes. Follow-up MRI performed two months later: (E) Axial T2-weighted sequence shows, in spite of movement artefacts, an almost complete disappearance of the hypersignal abnormalities compared to the first MRI (D). Better images could not be acquired due to patient’s movement.(JPEG 94 kb)

VIDEO 1 On day 12, before the treatment with levetiracetam began, the patient presented wide myoclonus of the four limbs and trunks. Sitting down in his bed was impossible for him. Absent at rest, myoclonus became apparent during movements while trying to reach the physician’s hand. On day 16, 3 days after the treatment began, the neurological status had mildly improved. There was less myoclonus but voluntary movements were still difficult; the patient was unable to pick up the hammer on the table. On day 19, after 7 days of treatment, the patient was able to sit in the chair. Myoclonus had almost disappeared and he could perform precise voluntary movements (3GP 690 kb)

VIDEO 2 On day 20, before the treatment with levetiracetam began, the patient presented wide myoclonus of the limbs and the head that were triggered by external stimuli. She did not obey commands. On day 22, 2 days after the treatment began, myoclonus was less intense. She was able to obey commands and sit in the chair. Two months after intensive care unit discharge, she had preserved mental function and obeyed commands. There were no abnormal movements at rest, but during voluntary movements, she presented residual myoclonus of the lower limbs that did not allow walking (3GP 388 kb)

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Cite this article

Venot, M., Weiss, N., Espinoza, S. et al. Improvement of early diagnosed post-anoxic myoclonus with levetiracetam. Intensive Care Med 37, 177–179 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00134-010-2055-6

Download citation

Keywords

  • Cardiac Arrest
  • Valproic Acid
  • Sufentanil
  • Levetiracetam
  • Piracetam