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Intensive Care Medicine

, Volume 36, Issue 6, pp 979–983 | Cite as

Pharmacokinetics of moxifloxacin in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock

  • Mathias W. Pletz
  • Frank Bloos
  • Olaf Burkhardt
  • Frank M. Brunkhorst
  • Stefanie M. Bode-Böger
  • Jens Martens-Lobenhoffer
  • Mark W. Greer
  • Heino Stass
  • Tobias Welte
Original

Abstract

Purpose

To investigate the steady-state pharmacokinetics of moxifloxacin in critically ill patients after intravenous administration of the 400 mg fixed dose.

Methods

Fifteen adult patients with severe sepsis (n = 3) or septic shock (n = 12) were enrolled in this dual-centre, prospective, open-label study. Moxifloxacin was administered with the recommended dose of 400 mg once daily i.v. for at least 5 days. Blood samples were obtained before and 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 12, 18 and 24 h after the third administration. Moxifloxacin concentrations in plasma were measured by HPLC with fluorescence detection.

Results

Data for 400 mg moxifloxacin i.v. were as follows (geometric mean): C max: 3.5 mg/l, t ½: 7.8 h and AUC (48–72 h): 25 mg h/l. In five individual patients AUC (48–72 h) was <20 mg h/l.

Conclusion

The main pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics parameter predicting clinical efficacy of moxifloxacin is AUC/MIC. The mean AUC of patients with severe sepsis or septic shock was lower compared to healthy volunteers (39 mg h/l). In 5 of 12 patients the AUC was halved compared to healthy volunteers.

Keywords

Clinical trial Intensive care Sepsis Human Moxifloxacin Pharmacokinetics 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was supported the German Competence Network Sepsis (SepNet) funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF, Grant no. 01 KI 0106) and by an unrestricted grant from Bayer Healthcare, Germany.

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Copyright information

© Copyright jointly held by Springer and ESICM 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mathias W. Pletz
    • 1
  • Frank Bloos
    • 2
  • Olaf Burkhardt
    • 1
  • Frank M. Brunkhorst
    • 2
  • Stefanie M. Bode-Böger
    • 3
  • Jens Martens-Lobenhoffer
    • 3
  • Mark W. Greer
    • 1
  • Heino Stass
    • 4
  • Tobias Welte
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Respiratory MedicineHannover Medical SchoolHannoverGermany
  2. 2.Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care MedicineUniversity Hospital JenaJenaGermany
  3. 3.Institute of Clinical PharmacologyOtto-von-Guericke-University of MagdeburgMagdeburgGermany
  4. 4.Research CenterBAYER HealthCare AGWuppertalGermany

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