Intensive Care Medicine

, Volume 34, Issue 9, pp 1724–1731

Time-dependent behavioral recovery after sepsis in rats

  • Lisiane Tuon
  • Clarissa M. Comim
  • Fabricia Petronilho
  • Tatiana Barichello
  • Ivan Izquierdo
  • João Quevedo
  • Felipe Dal-Pizzol
Experimental

DOI: 10.1007/s00134-008-1129-1

Cite this article as:
Tuon, L., Comim, C.M., Petronilho, F. et al. Intensive Care Med (2008) 34: 1724. doi:10.1007/s00134-008-1129-1

Abstract

Objective

To evaluate the cognitive performance in rats that survived sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) after 10, 30 and 60 days.

Design

Prospective, controlled experiment.

Setting

Animal basic science laboratory.

Subjects

Male Wistar rats, weighing 300–350 g.

Interventions

The rats were sham-operated or submitted to CLP (sepsis group) with “basic support” (saline, s.c. at 50 mL/kg immediately and 12 h after CLP plus ceftriaxone, s.c. at 30 mg/kg and clindamycin, s.c. at 25 mg/kg 6, 12 and 18 h after CLP).

Measurements and main results

The animals underwent six behavioral tasks 10, 30 and 60 days after surgery: (a) habituation to the open field; (b) inhibitory avoidance task; (c) continuous multiple trials step-down inhibitory avoidance task; (d) object recognition; (e) elevated plus-maze; and (f) forced swimming test. We demonstrated that survivors 10 days after CLP presented deficits on the habituation to the open field, step-down inhibitory avoidance, continuous multiple-trials step-down inhibitory avoidance, object recognition and forced swimming. After 30 days of sepsis induction, survivors maintained deficits on the step-down inhibitory avoidance, continuous multiple-trials step-down inhibitory avoidance and forced swimming. However, after 60 days all behavior deficits were reversed.

Conclusions

These results indicate that the impairment of memory and learning, demonstrated 10 days after the induction of sepsis, persist 30 days after the CLP. The cognitive impairments did not persist after 60 days suggesting that this model can help in the understanding of the biological mechanisms associated with sepsis-induced sickness behavior.

Keywords

Sepsis Learning Memory Depression Anxiety Central nervous system 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lisiane Tuon
    • 1
  • Clarissa M. Comim
    • 1
  • Fabricia Petronilho
    • 2
  • Tatiana Barichello
    • 2
  • Ivan Izquierdo
    • 3
  • João Quevedo
    • 1
  • Felipe Dal-Pizzol
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratório de Neurociências, Programa de Pós-Graduação Ciências da SaúdeUnidade Acadêmica de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade do Extremo Sul CatarinenseCriciúmaBrazil
  2. 2.Laboratório de Fisiopatologia Experimental, PPGCSUNASAU, Universidade do Extremo Sul CatarinenseCriciúmaBrazil
  3. 3.Centro de Memória, Instituto de Pesquisas BiomédicasPontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do SulPorto AlegreBrazil

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