Intensive Care Medicine

, Volume 33, Issue 12, pp 2218–2218 | Cite as

Limitations of brain death in the interpretation of computed tomographic angiography

Correspondence

References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PediatricsUniversity of AlbertaEdmontonCanada
  2. 2.Pediatric Intensive Care Unit3A3.07 Stollery Children’s HospitalEdmontonCanada

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