Intensive Care Medicine

, Volume 33, Issue 6, pp 951–962

Results from the International Conference of Experts on Intra-abdominal Hypertension and Abdominal Compartment Syndrome. II. Recommendations

  • Michael L. Cheatham
  • Manu L. N. G.  Malbrain
  • Andrew Kirkpatrick
  • Michael Sugrue
  • Michael Parr
  • Jan De Waele
  • Zsolt Balogh
  • Ari Leppäniemi
  • Claudia Olvera
  • Rao Ivatury
  • Scott D’Amours
  • Julia Wendon
  • Ken Hillman
  • Alexander Wilmer
Expert Panel

DOI: 10.1007/s00134-007-0592-4

Cite this article as:
Cheatham, M.L., Malbrain, M.L.N.G., Kirkpatrick, A. et al. Intensive Care Med (2007) 33: 951. doi:10.1007/s00134-007-0592-4

Abstract

Objective

Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) have been increasingly recognized in the critically ill over the past decade. In the absence of consensus definitions and treatment guidelines the diagnosis and management of IAH and ACS remains variable from institution to institution.

Design

An international consensus group of multidisciplinary critical care specialists convened at the second World Congress on Abdominal Compartment Syndrome to develop practice guidelines for the diagnosis, management, and prevention of IAH and ACS.

Methods

Prior to the conference the authors developed a blueprint for consensus definitions and treatment guidelines which were refined both during and after the conference. The present article is the second installment of the final report from the 2004 International ACS Consensus Definitions Conference and is endorsed by the World Society of the Abdominal Compartment Syndrome.

Results

The prevalence and etiological factors for IAH and ACS are reviewed. Evidence-based medicine treatment guidelines are presented to facilitate the diagnosis and management of IAH and ACS. Recommendations to guide future studies are proposed.

Conclusions

These definitions, guidelines, and recommendations, based upon current best evidence and expert opinion are proposed to assist clinicians in the management of IAH and ACS as well as serve as a reference for future clinical and basic science research.

Keywords

Abdominal pressure Abdominal hypertension Abdominal compartment syndrome Diagnosis Management Prevention Guidelines 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael L. Cheatham
    • 1
  • Manu L. N. G.  Malbrain
    • 2
    • 3
  • Andrew Kirkpatrick
    • 4
  • Michael Sugrue
    • 5
  • Michael Parr
    • 6
  • Jan De Waele
    • 7
  • Zsolt Balogh
    • 8
  • Ari Leppäniemi
    • 9
  • Claudia Olvera
    • 10
  • Rao Ivatury
    • 11
  • Scott D’Amours
    • 5
  • Julia Wendon
    • 12
  • Ken Hillman
    • 6
  • Alexander Wilmer
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Surgical EducationOrlando Regional Medical CenterOrlandoUSA
  2. 2.Intensive Care Unit, Ziekenhuis Netwerk AntwerpenCampus StuivenbergAntwerpen 6Belgium
  3. 3.Intensive Care UnitUniversity Hospital GasthuisbergLeuvenBelgium
  4. 4.Departments of Critical Care Medicine and SurgeryFoothills Medical CentreCalgary AB, T2N 2T9Canada
  5. 5.Department of TraumaLiverpool Hospital, University of New South WalesSydneyAustralia
  6. 6.Intensive Care UnitLiverpool Hospital, University of New South WalesSydneyAustralia
  7. 7.Surgical Intensive Care Unit, Intensieve Zorgen 1K12-CUniversitair Ziekenhuis GentGentBelgium
  8. 8.Department of Trauma, Division of SurgeryUniversity of NewcastleNewcastleAustralia
  9. 9.Department of Emergency SurgeryMeilahti HospitalHaartmaninkatuFinland
  10. 10.Intensive Care UnitAmerican British Cowdray Medical CenterMexico CityMexico
  11. 11.Department of Surgery, Trauma and Critical CareVirginia Commonwealth University Medical CenterRichmondUSA
  12. 12.Intensive Care UnitKing’s College HospitalLondonUK

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