Intensive Care Medicine

, Volume 33, Issue 2, pp 308–314 | Cite as

Effects of vaporized perfluorohexane and partial liquid ventilation on regional distribution of alveolar damage in experimental lung injury

  • Peter M. Spieth
  • Lilla Knels
  • Michael Kasper
  • André  Domingues Quelhas
  • Bärbel Wiedemann
  • Amelie Lupp
  • Matthias Hübler
  • Antonio Gianella Neto
  • Thea Koch
  • Marcelo Gama de Abreu
EXPERIMENTAL

Abstract

Objective

To determine whether the patterns of distribution of histological effects of vaporized perfluorohexane (PFH) and partial liquid ventilation (PLV) differ significantly in acute lung injury.

Design and setting

Experimental study in an animal research laboratory.

Subjects

Eighteen pigs.

Interventions

After induction of acute lung injury by means of infusion of oleic acid animals were randomly assigned to PFH, PLV, or gas ventilation (GV) groups. Six hours thereafter animals were killed, and lung tissue samples were taken for analysis.

Measurements and results

Histopathological analysis revealed less damage with PFH than with GV or PLV in the nondependent and central regions. PFH and PLV showed less injury in the dependent regions than GV. GV and PFH were associated with less histological damage in the nondependent than the dependent regions, whereas PLV presented the opposite pattern. Morphometric analysis showed increased aeration in nondependent than dependent regions with PFH and GV. PLV led to more aeration in the periphery than in central areas.

Conclusions

PFH was associated with a more homogeneous attenuation of alveolar damage across the lungs, although this therapy had more pronounced effects in nondependent zones. PLV showed the opposite pattern, with more important reduction in alveolar damage in dependent lung regions. Interestingly, reduction in alveolar damage with PFH was as effective as with PLV in dependent zones. Our findings suggest that vaporized perfluorocarbon could be advantageous as adjunctive therapy in the treatment of acute lung injury.

Keywords

Liquid ventilation Fluorocarbons Animal Acute lung injury Histology Oleic acid 

Supplementary material

134_2006_428_MOESM1_ESM.doc (127 kb)
Electronic Supplementary Material (DOC 143K)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter M. Spieth
    • 1
  • Lilla Knels
    • 1
    • 2
  • Michael Kasper
    • 2
  • André  Domingues Quelhas
    • 3
  • Bärbel Wiedemann
    • 4
  • Amelie Lupp
    • 5
  • Matthias Hübler
    • 1
  • Antonio Gianella Neto
    • 3
  • Thea Koch
    • 1
  • Marcelo Gama de Abreu
    • 1
  1. 1.Clinic for Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Therapy, Carl Gustav Carus Medical CollegeTechnical University of Dresden and University HospitalDresdenGermany
  2. 2.Institute of Anatomy, Carl Gustav Carus Medical CollegeTechnical University of DresdenDresdenGermany
  3. 3.Biomedical Engineering Program, Coordenação dos Programas de Posgraduação de EngenhariaFederal University of Rio de JaneiroRio de JaneiroBrazil
  4. 4.Institute of Biometry and Medical Informatics, Carl Gustav Carus Medical CollegeTechnical University of DresdenDresdenGermany
  5. 5.Institute of Pharmacology and ToxicologyFriedrich Schiller UniversityJenaGermany

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