Intensive Care Medicine

, Volume 32, Issue 5, pp 766–769 | Cite as

Relation between indocyanine green (ICG) plasma disappearance rate and ICG blood clearance in critically ill patients

Brief Report

Abstract

Objective

In contrast to indocyanine green (ICG) blood clearance, the plasma disappearance rate (PDR) of ICG does not require absolute ICG blood concentrations and today can be assessed transcutaneously. In this study, we analyzed the relation between ICG disappearance rate and ICG blood clearance as parameters of liver function in critically patients.

Design

Observational, clinical study. Retrospective analysis.

Setting

Operative intensive care unit of a university hospital.

Patients

209 patients (139 male, 70 female, age 10–88 years, 53 ± 19 years) who underwent liver function monitoring for clinical indication. Patients suffered from sepsis (n = 99), acute respiratory distress syndrome (n = 31), severe head injury (n = 38), hemorrhagic shock (n = 19), intracranial hemorrhage (n = 19), and cerebral infarction (n = 3). All patients were sedated and mechanically ventilated via an endotracheal tube.

Measurements and results

All patients were monitored by the transpulmonary double-indicator (thermo-dye dilution) technique using a thermistor and calibrated fiber-optic system (Pulsiocath 4F, PV 2024L, Pulsion Medical Systems, Munich, Germany). For each measurement, a dosage of 0.3 mg/kg ICG was injected central-venously. Transpulmonary ICG concentration curves were analyzed automatically using a computer system (COLD-Z021, Pulsion Medical Systems, Munich, Germany). By using the first ICG measurement in each patient after admission to the ICU, we analyzed 209 pairs of ICG disappearance rate and ICG blood clearance. Linear regression analysis revealed a correlation of r2 = 0.77 between ICG-PDR and ICG blood clearance.

Conclusion

ICG-PDR does reflect ICG blood clearance with sufficient accuracy in critically ill patients and may be used as a surrogate.

Keywords

Clearance Critically ill patients Indocyanine green Plasma disappearance rate 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care MedicineFriedrich-Schiller-University of JenaJenaGermany

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