Intensive Care Medicine

, Volume 29, Issue 11, pp 2034–2042 | Cite as

Effect of continuous hemofiltration on hemodynamics, lung inflammation and pulmonary edema in a canine model of acute lung injury

  • Xiao Su
  • Chunxue Bai
  • Qunying Hong
  • Duming Zhu
  • Lixian He
  • Jianping Wu
  • Feng Ding
  • Xiaohui Fang
  • Michael A. Matthay
Experimental

Abstract

Objective

This study examined whether continuous hemofiltration favorably affects cardiopulmonary variables, lung inflammation, and lung fluid balance in a canine model of oleic acid induced acute lung injury.

Methods

Eleven pentobarbital-anesthetized dogs were randomly divided into a control (mechanical ventilation, MV) group (n=6) and a MV plus hemofiltration (HF) group (n=5). All animals received an intravenous injection of oleic acid (0.09 ml/kg) to induce acute lung injury. Continuous arterial-venous hemofiltration (blood flow 100 ml/min, ultrafiltration rate at 50–65 ml kg−1 h−1) was started after establishment of oleic acid induced acute lung injury and continued for 4 h. Hemodynamics, lung mechanics, gas exchange, lung fluid balance, lung histology, and the level of plasma cytokines were assessed.

Results

After 240 min of HF treatment there was a significant increase in cardiac output, reduction in pulmonary arterial pressure, and improvement in both oxygenation and lung mechanics. Also, in the HF group the lung wet-to-dry weight ratio was significantly reduced. Histologically, HF reduced edema and inflammatory cell infiltration in the lung. There was also a significantly greater decrease in plasma IL-6 and IL-8 levels in the HF group than in group receiving MV alone.

Conclusions

In a canine model of acute lung injury continuous HF improved cardiopulmonary function, reduced pulmonary edema, decreased lung permeability and inflammation, and decreased the plasma concentration of proinflammatory cytokines.

Keywords

Hemofiltration Oleic acid Acute lung injury Hemodynamics Lung mechanics Cytokine 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This study was supported by a grant from the Committee of Science and Technology of Shanghai (O3D219619) and in part by National Institutes of Health Grant HL 51854. The authors thank Miss J. Li for technical assistance and supply of reagents, Mr. Qin for care of the animals, Dr. Z.Y. Ren and S. Zhang PhD for helpful discussions, and Senxiong Immunol Lab for the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xiao Su
    • 1
  • Chunxue Bai
    • 1
  • Qunying Hong
    • 1
  • Duming Zhu
    • 1
  • Lixian He
    • 1
  • Jianping Wu
    • 2
  • Feng Ding
    • 2
  • Xiaohui Fang
    • 3
  • Michael A. Matthay
    • 3
  1. 1.Research Institute of Respiratory Diseases, Zhongshan HospitalFudan UniversityShanghaiP.R. China
  2. 2.Department of Nephrology, Huashan HospitalFudan UniversityShanghaiP.R. China
  3. 3.Department of Medicine and Anesthesia, Cardiovascular Research InstituteUniversity of CaliforniaSan FranciscoUSA

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