Intensive Care Medicine

, Volume 28, Issue 4, pp 386–388 | Cite as

Functional hemodynamic monitoring

  • Michael R. Pinsky
Editorial

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael R. Pinsky
  1. 1.University of Pittsburgh Medical CenterPittsburghUSA

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