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Effective Role of Biochar, Zeolite and Steel Slag on Leaching Behavior of Cd and Its Fractionations in Soil Column Study

  • Saqib BashirEmail author
  • Abdus Salam
  • Muzammal Rehman
  • Shahbaz Khan
  • Allah Bakhsh Gulshan
  • Javaid Iqbal
  • Muhammad Shaaban
  • Sajid Mehmood
  • Anaam Zahra
  • Hongqing HuEmail author
Article

Abstract

Remediation of cadmium (Cd) from contaminated soils is considered a complicated task of environmental safety. A column leaching experiment was planned to estimate the influence of biochar (BC), zeolite (ZE) and steel slag (SL) at 1.5% and 3% application rate on Cd leaching behavior and chemical fractionation in contaminated soil. A sequential extraction procedure, the European Community Bureau of Reference (BCR), Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and NH4NO3 were performed after leaching was completed. The soluble portion of Cd was decreased by 36.3%, 18.4% and 28.7% and Cd contents in leachate were decreased by 44.8%, 30% and 31.3% after BC, ZE and SL addition at 3% rate, respectively over control soil. The greater reduction in TCLP extractable Cd was observed by 29.6% with BC and 22.4% with ZE and 25.7% with SL at 3% application rate. Overall, biochar can be considered an efficient soil amendment to reduce Cd leaching as well as increased its stabilization within soil profile.

Keywords

Cadmium Immobilization Passivators Leaching Sequential extraction 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Saqib Bashir
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Abdus Salam
    • 1
  • Muzammal Rehman
    • 5
  • Shahbaz Khan
    • 4
  • Allah Bakhsh Gulshan
    • 3
  • Javaid Iqbal
    • 4
  • Muhammad Shaaban
    • 1
  • Sajid Mehmood
    • 1
  • Anaam Zahra
    • 3
  • Hongqing Hu
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Key Laboratory of Arable Land Conservation (Middle and Lower Reaches of Yangtse River), Ministry of Agriculture, College of Resources and EnvironmentHuazhong Agricultural UniversityWuhanChina
  2. 2.Department of Soil & Environmental ScienceGhazi UniversityDera Ghazi KhanPakistan
  3. 3.Department of BotanyGhazi UniversityDera Ghazi KhanPakistan
  4. 4.Department of AgronomyGhazi UniversityDera Ghazi KhanPakistan
  5. 5.College of Plant Science and TechnologyHuazhong Agricultural UniversityWuhanPeople’s Republic of China

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