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Adsorption and Desorption of Carbendazim and Thiamethoxam in Five Different Agricultural Soils

  • Lingxi Han
  • Qiqing Ge
  • Jiajia Mei
  • Yanli Cui
  • Yongfei Xue
  • Yunlong Yu
  • Hua FangEmail author
Article

Abstract

The adsorption and desorption behaviors of carbendazim (CBD) and thiamethoxam (TMX) were systematically studied in five different agricultural soils. The adsorption and desorption isotherms of CBD and TMX in the five different soils were fitted well by the Freundlich model. The Freundlich adsorption coefficient (Kfads) and Freundlich desorption coefficient (Kfdes) of CBD in the five different soils were 1.46–19.53 and 1.81–3.33, respectively. The corresponding values of TMX were 1.19–4.03 and 2.07–6.45, respectively. The adsorption affinity and desorption ability of the five different soils for CBD and TMX depended mainly on soil organic matter content (OMC) and cation exchange capacity (CEC). Desorption hysteresis occurred in the desorption process of CBD and TMX in the five different agricultural soils, especially for TMX. It is concluded that the adsorption–desorption ability of CBD was much higher than that of TMX in the five different agricultural soils, which was attributed to soil OMC and CEC.

Keywords

Carbendazim Thiamethoxam Adsorption Desorption Soil 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the National Key Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2016YFD0200205), the National Nature Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41877144), and the Zhejiang Provincial National Science Foundation of China (Grant No. LY18B070001).

Supplementary material

128_2019_2568_MOESM1_ESM.doc (232 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOC 232 KB)

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lingxi Han
    • 1
  • Qiqing Ge
    • 1
  • Jiajia Mei
    • 1
  • Yanli Cui
    • 1
  • Yongfei Xue
    • 1
  • Yunlong Yu
    • 1
  • Hua Fang
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Institute of Pesticide and Environmental Toxicology, College of Agriculture & BiotechnologyZhejiang UniversityHangzhouChina

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