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The Potential Use of Vetiveria zizanioides for the Phytoremediation of Antimony, Arsenic and Their Co-Contamination

  • Nosheen Mirza
  • Hussani MubarakEmail author
  • Li-Yuan Chai
  • Wang Yong
  • Muhammad Jamil Khan
  • Qudrat Ullah Khan
  • Muhammad Zaffar Hashmi
  • Umar Farooq
  • Rizwana Sarwar
  • Zhi-Hui YangEmail author
Article

Abstract

Antimony (Sb) and arsenic (As) contaminations are the well reported and alarming issues of various contaminated smelting and mining sites all over the world, especially in China. The present hydroponic study was to assess the capacity of Vetiveria zizanioides for Sb, As and their interactive accumulations. The novelty of the present research is this that the potential of V. zizanioides for Sb and As alone and their interactive accumulation are unaddressed. This is the first report about the interactive co-accumulation of Sb and As in V. zizanioides. Highest applied Sb and As contaminations significantly inhibited the plant growth. Applied Sb and As alone significantly increased their concentrations in the roots/shoot of V. zizanioides. While co-contamination of Sb and As steadily increased their concentrations, in the plant. The co-contamination of Sb and As revealed a positive correlation between the two, as they supplemented the uptake and accumulation of each other. The overall translocation (TF) and bioaccumulation factors (BF) of Sb in V. zizanioides, were 0.75 and 4. While the TF and BF of As in V. zizanioides, were 0.86 and 10. V. zizanioides proved as an effective choice for the phytoremediation and ecosystem restoration of Sb and As contaminated areas.

Keywords

Vetiver (Vetiveria zizanioides L.) Antimony (Sb) Arsenic (As) Co-contamination Phytoremediation Hydroponics 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The financial support of this work by the Science and Technology Program for Public Wellbeing (2012GS430201); and the Key Project of Science and Technology of Hunan Province, China (2012FJ1010) is gratefully acknowledged.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nosheen Mirza
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Hussani Mubarak
    • 1
    • 3
    • 4
    Email author
  • Li-Yuan Chai
    • 1
    • 3
  • Wang Yong
    • 1
    • 3
  • Muhammad Jamil Khan
    • 5
  • Qudrat Ullah Khan
    • 5
  • Muhammad Zaffar Hashmi
    • 6
  • Umar Farooq
    • 7
  • Rizwana Sarwar
    • 7
  • Zhi-Hui Yang
    • 1
    • 3
    Email author
  1. 1.School of Metallurgy and EnvironmentCentral South UniversityChangshaChina
  2. 2.Department of Environmental SciencesCOMSATS Institute of Information TechnologyAbbottabadPakistan
  3. 3.Chinese National Engineering Research Center for Control and Treatment of Heavy Metal PollutionChangshaChina
  4. 4.Department of Soil and Environmental SciencesGhazi UniversityDera Ghazi KhanPakistan
  5. 5.Department of Soil and Environmental SciencesGomal UniversityDera Ismail KhanPakistan
  6. 6.Department of MeteorologyCOMSATS Institute of Information TechnologyIslamabadPakistan
  7. 7.Department of ChemistryCOMSATS Institute of Information TechnologyAbbottabadPakistan

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