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Mercury Concentrations in Commercial Fish Species of Lake Phewa, Nepal

  • Chhatra Mani SharmaEmail author
  • Suresh Basnet
  • Shichang Kang
  • Bjørn Olav Rosseland
  • Qianggong Zhang
  • Ke Pan
  • Reidar Borgstrøm
  • Qing Li
  • Wen-Xiong Wang
  • Jie Huang
  • Hans-Christian Teien
  • Subodh Sharma
Article

Abstract

Mercury (Hg) concentrations in four commercial fish species (Tilapia Oreochromis niloticus, Spiny Eel Mastacembelus armatus, African catfish Clarias gariepinus, and Sahar Tor putitora), were investigated in Lake Phewa, Nepal. Mean values of total mercury (THg mg kg−1, ww) in these fishes were 0.02, 0.07, 0.05, and 0.12 respectively. Methylmercury contributed 82 % of THg. The lowest value was detected in O. niloticus, an exclusive plant feeder. The biomagnification rate of Hg through the fish community was 0.041 per δ15N (‰). The present investigation produced an important baseline data of Hg pollution in the fish community in this region.

Keywords

Mercury Commercial fish Biomagnification Lake Phewa 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The first author (Chhatra Mani SHARMA) is supported by Chinese Academy of Sciences as a Young International Scientist (Grant # 2009Y2AZ10). The additional supports were from the National Nature Science Foundation of China (Grant # 40830743) and the State Key Laboratory of Cryospheric Science (SKLCS-ZZ-2008-01). Kiran Maharjan (diet analysis), Solfrid Lohne and Gjermund Strømman (analysis of Hg and stable isotopes), Roshan Raut, Prabina Tiwari and Prabesh Sing Kunwar (fish sampling) also deserve many thanks.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chhatra Mani Sharma
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Suresh Basnet
    • 3
  • Shichang Kang
    • 1
    • 4
  • Bjørn Olav Rosseland
    • 3
  • Qianggong Zhang
    • 1
  • Ke Pan
    • 5
  • Reidar Borgstrøm
    • 3
  • Qing Li
    • 1
  • Wen-Xiong Wang
    • 5
  • Jie Huang
    • 1
  • Hans-Christian Teien
    • 6
  • Subodh Sharma
    • 7
  1. 1.Key Laboratory of Tibetan Environmental Changes and Land Surface Processes, Institute of Tibetan Plateau ResearchChinese Academy of Sciences (CAS)BeijingChina
  2. 2.Human and Natural Resources Studies CentreKathmandu UniversityKathmanduNepal
  3. 3.Department of Ecology and Natural Resource ManagementNorwegian University of Life SciencesAsNorway
  4. 4.State Key Laboratory of Cryospheric SciencesChinese Academy of SciencesLanzhouChina
  5. 5.Department of BiologyHong Kong University of Science and TechnologyHong KongChina
  6. 6.Department of Plant and Environmental SciencesNorwegian University of Life SciencesAsNorway
  7. 7.Aquatic Ecology CentreKathmandu UniversityKathmanduNepal

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