Ecotoxicity Bioassays on Leachates from Poultry Manure

  • M. Delgado
  • R. Miralles de Imperial
  • F. Alonso
  • C. Rodríguez
  • J. V. Martín
Article

Abstract

The main aim of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of different poultry manure landfill leachates, using a well-known toxicity test system (MS3). The bioassay was made using a battery of toxicity tests including acute toxicity with crustacean (Daphnia magna), algae (Chlorella vulgaris) and the in vitro toxicity test with the fish cell line RTG-2. On D. magna was high mortality for zero time and almost 100 % and 70 %–80 % mortality for sawdust and straw poultry manure respectively. No effects on C. vulgaris, was observed after the leachate exposure. None of the parameters considered: protein, EROD activity, β-gal activity and neutral red, showed differences between control test and the leachate collected from exposure to poultry manure.

Keywords

Poultry manure Daphnia magna Chlorella vulgaris In vitro RTG-21 

References

  1. Babin MM, Tarazona JV (2005) In vitro toxicity of selected pesticides on RTG-2 and RTL-W1 fish cell lines. Environ Pollut 135:267–274CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Borenfreund E, Puerner JÁ (1985) Toxicity determined in vitro by morphological alterations and neutral red absorption. Toxicol Lett 24:119–124CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Delgado M, Martín JV, Miralles de Imperial R, León C, Garcia MC (2010) Phytotoxicity of uncomposted and composted poultry manure. Afr J Plant Sci 4(5):154–162Google Scholar
  4. Delgado M, Rodriguez C, Martín JV, Miralles de Imperial R, Alonso F (2012) Environmental assay on the effect of poultry manure application on soil organisms in agro-ecosystem. Sci Total Environ 416:532–535CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Dikinya O, Mufwanzala N (2010) Chicken manure-enhanced soil fertility and productivity: effects of application rates. Soil Sci Environ Manag 1(3):46–54Google Scholar
  6. Fernández C, Cagigal E, Vega M, Tarazona JV (2005) Ecological risk assessment of contaminated soils through direct toxicity assessment. Ecotoxicol Environ Saf 62:174–184CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Institute SAS (2001) SAS user’s guide: statistic. SAS inst, Cary, NCGoogle Scholar
  8. ISO 6341 (1996) Water quality. Determination of the inhibition of the mobility of Daphnia magna straus (Cladocer, Crustacea). Acute toxicity test. 3rd ednGoogle Scholar
  9. López-Masquera ME, Cabaleiro F, Sainz MS, López-Fabal A, Carral E (2008) Fertilizing value of broiler litter: effects of dryng and pelletizing. Bioresour Technol 99:5626–5633CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Navas J, Babin M, Casado S, Fernandez C, Tarazona JV (2006) The Prestige oil spill: a laboratory study about the toxicity of the water-soluble faction of fuel oil. Marine Environ Res 62:s352–s355CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. OECD (organization for economic cooperation and development) (2004) OCDE guidelines for testing of chemicals. Daphnia sp acute toxicity test. OECD Guideline No 202, Paris, France 2004Google Scholar
  12. Ramos C, de la Torre AI, Tarazona JV, Muñoz MJ (1996) Desarrollo de un ensayo de inhibición del crecimiento de Chlorella vulgaris utilizando un test en microplacas. Rev Toxicol 13:97–100Google Scholar
  13. Slomczynska B, Slomczynski T (2004) Physico-chemical and toxicological characteristics of leachates from MSW landfills. Pol J Environ Stud 6:627–637Google Scholar
  14. Vega M, Fernandez C, Blazquez T, Tarazona JV, Castaño A (1996) Biological and chemical tools in the toxicological risk assessment of Jarama river, Madrid Spain. Environ Pollut 93:135–139CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Delgado
    • 1
  • R. Miralles de Imperial
    • 1
  • F. Alonso
    • 2
  • C. Rodríguez
    • 1
  • J. V. Martín
    • 1
  1. 1.Environmental DepartmentINIAMadridSpain
  2. 2.Agricultural and Livestock Facilities and Environment. EUIT AgrícolaUniversidad Politécnica de MadridMadridSpain

Personalised recommendations