Survey of Hazardous Organic Compounds in the Groundwater, Air and Wastewater Effluents Near the Tehran Automobile Industry

  • Mahdi Kargar
  • Kazem Nadafi
  • Ramin Nabizadeh
  • Simin Nasseri
  • Alireza Mesdaghinia
  • Amir Hossein Mahvi
  • Mahmood Alimohammadi
  • Shahrokh Nazmara
  • Noushin Rastkari
Article

Abstract

Potential of wastewater treatment in car industry and groundwater contamination by volatile organic compounds include perchloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE) and dichloromethane (DCM) near car industry was conducted in this study. Samples were collected in September through December 2011 from automobile industry. Head-space Gas chromatography with FID detector is used for analysis. Mean PCE levels in groundwater ranged from 0 to 63.56 μg L−1 with maximum level of 89.1 μg L−1. Mean TCE from 0 to 76.63 μg L−1 with maximum level of 112 μg L−1. Due to the data obtained from pre treatment of car staining site and conventional wastewater treatment in car factory, the most of TCE, PCE and DCM removed by pre aeration. Therefor this materials entry from liquid phase to air phase and by precipitation leak out to the groundwater. As a consequence these pollutants have a many negative health effect on the workers by air and groundwater.

Keywords

Trichloroethylene Perchloroethylene Dichloromethane Car industry 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mahdi Kargar
    • 1
  • Kazem Nadafi
    • 1
  • Ramin Nabizadeh
    • 1
  • Simin Nasseri
    • 1
  • Alireza Mesdaghinia
    • 1
  • Amir Hossein Mahvi
    • 1
  • Mahmood Alimohammadi
    • 1
  • Shahrokh Nazmara
    • 1
  • Noushin Rastkari
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Environmental Health Engineering, School of Public HealthTehran University of Medical SciencesTehranIran
  2. 2.Institute of Environmental ResearchTehran University of Medical SciencesTehranIran

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