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Dual Role of Vitamin C Utilization in NO2-Induced Oxidative Stress in Lung Tissues of Mice

  • Yingyi Zhang
  • Chunyan Ma
  • Yuhuan Xiao
  • Chang Liu
  • Qiang Xu
  • Yan Wang
  • Xin Xu
  • Lin HaoEmail author
Article

Abstract

Earlier studies with in vitro models have revealed that application of vitamin C can act as a primary NO2 absorption substrate to contribute to NO2-induced cellular injury. In the present study, we showed that the pharmacological application of vitamin C had dual role in lungs of mice exposed to NO2, with an exacerbated oxidative stress occurring at low concentrations, as indicated by excessive reactive oxygen species production and lipid peroxidation. However, at high concentrations, vitamin C functioned as an antioxidant removing reactive oxygen species and maintaining a reducing status in cells, alleviating NO2-induced oxidative toxicity.

Keywords

Mice Nitrogen dioxide Vitamin C Lipid peroxidation Antioxidant defense 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We would like to thank Dr. Sheng T Hou (Institute for Biological Sciences, National Research Council of Canada) for comments on the manuscript. This research was partly supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (30570445) and Director Foundation of Experimental centre, Shenyang Normal University (SY200802).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yingyi Zhang
    • 1
  • Chunyan Ma
    • 1
  • Yuhuan Xiao
    • 1
  • Chang Liu
    • 1
  • Qiang Xu
    • 1
  • Yan Wang
    • 1
  • Xin Xu
    • 1
  • Lin Hao
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.College of Life and Chemistry SciencesShenyang Normal UniversityShenyangPeople’s Republic of China

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