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Degradation of the Potato Glycoalkaloids – α-Solanine and α-Chaconine in Groundwater

  • Pia H. Jensen
  • Ole S. Jacobsen
  • Trine Henriksen
  • Bjarne W. Strobel
  • Hans Christian B. Hansen
Article

Abstract

The potato glycoalkaloids α-chaconine and α-solanine are produced in high amounts in potato plants from where release to soil takes place. Degradation of the compounds in groundwater was investigated, as their fate in the terrestrial environment is unknown. Abiotic and microbial degradation were followed in groundwater sampled from below a potato field and spiked with the glycoalkaloids (115 nmol/l). Degradation was primarily microbial and the glycoalkaloids were degraded within 21–42 days. The metabolites β1-solanine, γ-solanine, and solanidine were formed from α-solanine, while β-chaconine, γ-chaconine and solanidine were detected from α-chaconine. Thus, indigenous groundwater microorganisms are capable of degrading the glycoalkaloids.

Keywords

LC–MS Metabolites Natural toxin Solanum tuberosum L. 

Notes

Acknowledgment

This study was conducted within the Research School of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology (RECETO), University of Copenhagen.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pia H. Jensen
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ole S. Jacobsen
    • 2
  • Trine Henriksen
    • 2
    • 3
  • Bjarne W. Strobel
    • 1
  • Hans Christian B. Hansen
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Basic Sciences and Environment, Faculty of Life Sciences (Life)University of CopenhagenFrederiksbergDenmark
  2. 2.Department of GeochemistryGeological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS)Copenhagen KDenmark
  3. 3.Department of Clinical PharmacologyRigshospitalet, Copenhagen University HospitalCopenhagenDenmark

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