Advertisement

Biomonitoring Hospital Effluents by the Allium cepa L. Test

  • M. D. Bagatini
  • T. G. Vasconcelos
  • H. D. LaughinghouseIV
  • A. F. Martins
  • S. B. Tedesco
Article

Abstract

Hospital effluents are serious problems in developing countries like Brazil, and when not treated adequately, can cause mutagenic effects on live organisms. Biomonitors, like Allium cepa L., which is one of the most used plant species when monitoring effluent genotoxicity, have been used to alert the world population about environmental contamination and genotoxic chemical emissions. The Allium cepa test was used to evaluate the genotoxicity of a hospital effluent in Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. During the study, chromosomal disruptions, anaphasic bridges, and micronuclei during telophase were observed, indicating environmental toxicity risk.

Keywords

Hospital effluent Genotoxicity Allium cepa Toxicology Cell cycle 

References

  1. Ayres M, Ayres JRM (2003) BioEstat 3.0: aplicações estatísticas nas aréas das ciências biológicas e médicas. Belém, Sociedade Civil Mamiraua, Brasília, p 291Google Scholar
  2. Bassi MD, Moretton J (2003) Mutagenicity of antineoplastic drug residues treated in health care waste autoclave. Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 71:170–175. doi: 10.1007/s00128-003-0145-7 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Costa RMA, Menk CFM (2000) Biomonitoramento de mutagênese ambiental. In: Biotecnologia (ed) Ciência & Desenvolvimento, vol 2. pp 24–26Google Scholar
  4. El-Shahaby AO, Abdel Migid HM, Soliman MI, Mashaly IA (2003) Genotoxicity screening of industrial wastewater using the Allium cepa chromosome aberration assay. Pak J Biol Sci 6:23–28CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Fiskejö G (1993) The Allium test. In: Wastewater monitoring. Environ Toxicol Water Qual 8:291–298. doi: 10.1002/tox.2530080306
  6. Gadano A, Gurni A, López P, Ferraro G, Carballo M (2002) In vitro genotoxic evaluation of the medicinal plant Chenopodium ambrosioides. L. J Ethnopharmacol 81:11–16. doi: 10.1016/S0378-8741(01)00418-4 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Guerra M, Lopes MJS (2002) Como observar cromossomos—Um guia de técnicas em citogenética vegetal, animal e humana. FUNPEC, vol 1. Ribeirão Preto, p 131Google Scholar
  8. Paz M, Muzio H, Mendelson A, Magdaleno A, Tornello NB, Moretton J (2006) Evaluation of genotoxicity of Buenos Aires city hospital wastewater samples. J Braz Soc Ecotoxicol 1(1):1–6Google Scholar
  9. Rank J (2003) The method of Allium anaphase–telophase chromosome aberration assay. Ekologiia (Vilnius) 1:38–41Google Scholar
  10. Silva J, Erdtmann B, Henriques JAP (2003) Genética toxicológica. Alcance, Porto Alegre, pp 70–74Google Scholar
  11. Vicentini VEP, Camparoto ML, Teixeira RO, Mantovani MS (2001) Averrhoa carambola L., Syzygium cumini (L.) Skeels and Cissus sicyoides L.: medicinal herbal tea effects on vegetal and test systems. Acta Scientiarum 23(2):593–598Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. D. Bagatini
    • 1
  • T. G. Vasconcelos
    • 2
  • H. D. LaughinghouseIV
    • 3
  • A. F. Martins
    • 2
  • S. B. Tedesco
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Plant Cytogenetics, Department of Biology, Centro de Ciências Naturais e ExatasUniversidade Federal de Santa MariaSanta MariaBrazil
  2. 2.Laboratory of Research in Effluent and Residue Treatment (LATER), Department of Chemistry, Centro de Ciências Naturais e ExatasUniversidade Federal de Santa MariaSanta MariaBrazil
  3. 3.Department of Botany, National Museum of Natural HistorySmithsonian InstitutionWashingtonUSA

Personalised recommendations