Trace Metal Concentrations in Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) in Three Catchments, Sri Lanka

  • G. Allinson
  • S. A. Salzman
  • N. Turoczy
  • M. Nishikawa
  • U. S. Amarasinghe
  • K. G. S. Nirbadha
  • S. S. De Silva
Article

Abstract

Samples of the muscle and liver of the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) were obtained from a single reservoir in each of three Sri Lankan catchments (Kaudulla, Rajanganaya, and Udawalawe reservoirs in the Mahaweli, Kala Oya, and Walawe Ganga river basins, respectively) in 2002. The concentrations of 12 elements were consistently detected in the tilapia muscle and liver (Ca, Cd, Cu, Fe, Hg, K, Mg, Mn, Na, P, Sr and Zn). However, a three factorial principal components analysis suggested that there were no differences in the metal profiles (range of elements and concentration) of the fish obtained from any of the three reservoirs, although the chemistries of each tissue (muscle and liver) were different. Metal concentrations were below WHO and Food Standards Australia and New Zealand guideline values, and substantial quantities of tilapia would need to be consumed each week on a regular basis to exceed intake limits (e.g. more than 1.5 kg to exceed intake lits for Cu), suggesting consumption of tilapia from these reservoirs poses little risk to human health.

Keywords

Sri Lanka Artisanal fisheries Tilapia Metals Reservoirs 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Allinson
    • 1
  • S. A. Salzman
    • 2
  • N. Turoczy
    • 3
  • M. Nishikawa
    • 4
  • U. S. Amarasinghe
    • 5
  • K. G. S. Nirbadha
    • 5
  • S. S. De Silva
    • 6
    • 3
  1. 1.Future Farming Systems Research DivisionDepartment of Primary Industries Queenscliff CentreQueenscliffAustralia
  2. 2.School of Information SystemsDeakin UniversityWarrnamboolAustralia
  3. 3.School of Ecology and EnvironmentDeakin UniversityWarrnamboolAustralia
  4. 4.Laboratory for Intellectual Fundamentals for Environmental StudiesNational Institute for Environmental StudiesTsukubaJapan
  5. 5.Department of ZoologyUniversity of KelaniyaKelaniyaSri Lanka
  6. 6.Network of Aquaculture Centres in Asia-PacificBangkokThailand

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