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Heavy Metals in the Farming Environment and in some Selected Aquaculture Species in the Van Phong Bay and Nha Trang Bay of the Khanh Hoa Province in Vietnam

  • Ngo Dang Nghia
  • Bjørn Tore LunestadEmail author
  • Trang Si Trung
  • Nguyen Thanh Son
  • Amund Maage
Article

Abstract

Aquaculture is currently one of the most rapidly growing production sectors in Vietnam. This publication describes the concentrations of heavy metals in the farming environment and some aquaculture species in the Khanh Hoa Province in Vietnam. The concentration of total As in the sediments ranged from 0.07 to 0.64 mg/kg, whereas the concentration of Hg varied from <0.0005 to 0.56 mg/kg. The corresponding concentration span for Cd and Pb, were 0.001–0.069 and 0.016–0.078 mg/kg, respectively. The concentrations of As in the aquaculture organisms spanned from 0.14 to 1.03 mg/kg. For Hg the concentrations varied from 0.1 to 0.45 mg/kg, for Cd from 0.02 to 0.10 mg/kg and for Pb from 0.07 to 0.37 mg/kg.

Keywords

Heavy metals Aquaculture Vietnam 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors want to thank NORAD for funding this research as a part of the project “SRV2701–Improving training and Research capacity of the University of Fisheries”. The excellent technical assistance Mrs. Ngo Thi Hoai Duong and Mrs. Tran Nguyen Van Nhi is highly appreciated.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ngo Dang Nghia
    • 1
  • Bjørn Tore Lunestad
    • 2
    Email author
  • Trang Si Trung
    • 3
  • Nguyen Thanh Son
    • 1
  • Amund Maage
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of Biotechnology and EnvironmentUniversity of Nha TrangNha TrangVietnam
  2. 2.National Institute of Nutrition and Seafood Research (NIFES)BergenNorway
  3. 3.Seafood Processing FacultyUniversity of Fisheries, University of Nha TrangNha TrangVietnam

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