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A Comprehensive Geochemical Evaluation of the Water Quality of River Adyar, India

  • T. Venugopal
  • L. Giridharan
  • M. Jayaprakash
  • P. M. Velmurugan
Article

Abstract

The River Adyar flows through the fault of south Chennai for about 50 Km and enters into the Bay of Bengal. This river is almost stagnant and do not carry enough water except during rainy season. Rapid industrialization and urbanization along the river course during 80s and 90s of last century has increased the pollution of the river water. The main objective of this study is to identify and assess the nature of pollution. In order to achieve this objective, necessary geochemical parameters were determined and the quality of water is evaluated using various tools, such as Wilcox diagram, USIS, Piper, sodium absorption ratio (SAR), 3D scattered diagrams, and seasonal variation diagrams. The monsoonal variations in the data matrix of the river water (River Adyar) was monitored at 33 stations for the premonsoon and postmonsoon periods during September 2005 and February 2006.

Keywords

Water quality River Adyar Trace metal chemistry Geochemistry 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Venugopal
    • 1
  • L. Giridharan
    • 1
  • M. Jayaprakash
    • 1
  • P. M. Velmurugan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Applied GeologyUniversity of MadrasChennaiIndia

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