“Metals in Fresh Honeys from Tenerife Island, Spain”

  • Inmaculada Frías
  • Carmen Rubio
  • Tomás González-Iglesias
  • Ángel José Gutiérrez
  • Dailos González-Weller
  • Arturo Hardisson
Article

Abstract

Ashes and contents of Zn, Cu, Fe, Cd and Pb in 140 fresh honey samples from three different areas of Tenerife Island were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. A mean ash content of 0.35% has been determined. The mean Fe, Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd concentrations observed have been 3.37 mg kg−1, 1.28 mg kg−1, 2.83 mg kg−1, 37.33 μg kg−1, 4.38 μg kg−1, respectively. A direct statistical correlation has been found between the Fe–Zn and Fe–Pb content, and between the Cd–Zn and Cd–Pb levels.

Keywords

Essential metals Toxic metals Honey Canary Islands 

References

  1. Buldini PL, Cavalli S, Mevoli A, Lal Sharma J (2001) Ion chromatographic and voltammetric determination of heavy and transition metals in honey. Food Chem 73:487–495CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Fernández Torres R, Pérez Bernal JL, Bello López MA, Callejón Mochón M, Jiménez Sánchez JC, Guiraúm Pérez A (2005) Mineral content and botanical origin of Spanish honeys. Talanta 65:686–691CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Hernández OM, Fraga JMG, Jiménez AIU, Jiménez F, Arias JJ (2005) Characterization of honey from the Canary Islands: determination of the mineral content by atomic absorption spectrometry. Food Chem 93:449–458CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Institute of Medicine, Food and Nutrition Board (2001) Dietary reference intakes for arsenic, boron, chromium, copper, iodine, iron, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, silicon, vanadium, and zinc. National Academy Press, Washington, DCGoogle Scholar
  5. Przybytowski P, Wilczynska A (2001) Honey as an environmental marker. Food Chem 74:289–291CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Rashed MN, Soltan ME (2004) Major and trace elements in different types of Egyptian mono-floral and non-floral bee honeys. J Food Compost Anal 17:725–735CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Rodriguez-Otero JL, Paseiro P, Simal J, Terradillos L, Cepeda A (1992) Determination of Na, K, Ca, Mg, Cu, Fe, Mn and total catinic milliequivalents in Spanish commercial honeys. J Apic Res 31:65–69Google Scholar
  8. Rodriguez-Otero JL, Paseiro P, Simal J, Cepeda A (1994) Mineral content of the honeys produced in Galicia (North-West Spain). Food Chem 49:169–171CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Rubio C, González D, Alonso S, Revert C, Hardisson A (2004a) Aspectos nutricionales del calcio, hierro y fósforo. Alimentaria 353:31–35Google Scholar
  10. Rubio C, González D, Alonso S, Revert C, Hardisson A (2004b) Zn, Mn, Cu, Se, Cr: nutrición y suplementación. Alimentaria 353:37–44Google Scholar
  11. Rubio C, Gutiérrez AJ, Martín Izquierdo RE, Lozano G, Hardisson A (2004c) El cadmio como contaminante alimentario. Alimentaria 350:41–45Google Scholar
  12. Rubio C, González-Iglesias T, Revert C, Reguera JI, Gutiérrez AJ, Hardisson A (2005) Lead dietary intake in a Spanish population (Canary islands). J Agric Food Chem 53:6543–6549CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Yilmaz H, Yavuz O (1999) Content of some trace metals in honey from south-eastern Anatolia. Food Chem 65:475–476CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. World Health Organisation (WHO) (1993) Evaluation of certain foods additives and contaminants. Forty-first report of the joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Foods Additives (JECFA). WHO Technical Report Series, GenevaGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Inmaculada Frías
    • 1
  • Carmen Rubio
    • 1
  • Tomás González-Iglesias
    • 2
  • Ángel José Gutiérrez
    • 1
  • Dailos González-Weller
    • 1
  • Arturo Hardisson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ToxicologyUniversity of La LagunaLa Laguna, TenerifeSpain
  2. 2.Canarian Public Health ServiceSanta Cruz de Tenerife, TenerifeSpain

Personalised recommendations