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Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation of Coke-Plant Wastewater on Ruthenium-Based Eggshell Catalysts in a Bubbling Bed Reactor

  • M. Yang
  • Y. Sun
  • A. H. Xu
  • X. Y. Lu
  • H. Z. Du
  • C. L. SunEmail author
  • C. Li
Article

Abstract

Catalytic wet air of coke-plant wastewater was studied in a bubbling bed reactor. Two types of supported Ru-based catalysts, eggshell and uniform catalysts, were employed. Compared with the results in the wet air oxidation of coke-plant wastewater, supported Ru uniform catalysts showed high activity for chemical oxygen demand (COD) and ammonia/ammonium compounds (NH3-N) removal at temperature of 250 °C and pressure of 4.8 MPa, and it has been demonstrated that the catalytic activity of uniform catalyst depended strongly on the distribution of active sites of Ru on catalyst. Compared to the corresponding uniform catalysts with the same Ru loading (0.25wt.% and 0.1wt.%, respectively), the eggshell catalysts showed higher activities for CODcr removal and much higher activities for NH3-N degradation. The high activity of eggshell catalyst for treatment of coke-plant wastewater can be attributed to the higher density of active Ru sites in the shell layer than that of the corresponding uniform catalyst with the same Ru loading. It has been also evidenced that the active Ru sites in the internal core of uniform catalyst have very little or no contribution to CODcr and NH3-N removal in the total oxidation of coke-plant wastewater.

Keywords

Catalytic wet air oxidation  Ru catalysts  Bubbling bed reactor Eggshell catalyst Coke-plant wastewater 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the National High Technology Project (program number 2002AA601260).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Yang
    • 1
  • Y. Sun
    • 1
  • A. H. Xu
    • 1
  • X. Y. Lu
    • 1
  • H. Z. Du
    • 1
  • C. L. Sun
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • C. Li
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, Dalian Institute of Chemical PhysicsChinese Academy of SciencesDalianP. R. China
  2. 2.Group 902, Dalian Institute of Chemical PhysicsChinese Academy of SciencesDalianP.R. China

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