Advertisement

Exposure of Raptors and Waterbirds to Anticoagulant Rodenticides (Difenacoum, Bromadiolone, Coumatetralyl, Coumafen, Brodifacoum): Epidemiological Survey in Loire Atlantique (France)

  • O. Lambert
  • H. Pouliquen
  • M. Larhantec
  • C. Thorin
  • M. L’Hostis
Article

Anticoagulant rodenticides are commonly used to control rodent pests all over the world. These pesticides inhibit the vitamin K cycle in the liver, prevent blood clotting and cause death by hemorrhage. Despite the fact that they were intended for the control of commensal rodents, they may affect non target species, either directly by consumption of contaminated cereal-based baits, or indirectly by consumption of contaminated preys (secondary poisoning).

Secondary poisoning of non target species by anticoagulant rodenticides has been confirmed in many mammals and birds species, such as mustelids, foxes and birds of prey (Shore et al., 1996; Berny et al., 1997; Birks 1998; Stone et al., 1999; Stone et al.,2003; Harding 2004; Fournier-Chambrillon et al., 2004). Nevertheless, poisoning of non target species by direct consumption of anticoagulant rodenticides in the form of contaminated baits is poorly documented. Loire Atlantique is a French department well known for its wetlands and...

Keywords

European Mink Common Buzzard Brodifacoum Anticoagulant Rodenticide Bromadiolone 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

This research was financially supported by Neodis France.

References

  1. Berny PJ, Buronfosse T, Buronfosse F, Lamarque F, Lorgue G (1997) Field evidence of secondary poisoning of foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and buzzards (Buteo buteo) by bromadiolone, a 4-year survey. Chemosphere 8:1817–1829CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Birks JDS (1998) Secondary rodenticide poisoning risk arising from winter farmyard use by the European polecat Mustela putorius. Biol Conserv 85:233–240CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Fauconnet V, Pouliquen H, Pinault L (1997) Reversed-phase HPLC determination of eight anticoagulant rodenticides in animal liver. J Anal Toxicol 21:548–553Google Scholar
  4. Fournier-Chambrillon C, Berny PJ, Coiffier O, Barbedienne P, Dassé B, Delas G, Galineau H, Mazet A, Pouzenc P, Rosoux R, Fournier P (2004) Evidence of secondary poisoning of free-ranging riparian mustelids by anticoagulant rodenticides in France: implications for conservation of European mink (Mustela lutreola). J Wildl Dis 40:688–695Google Scholar
  5. Génsbøl B (1999) Guide des rapaces diurnes, Europe, Afrique du Nord et Moyen-Orient, 2nd edn. Delachaux et Niestlé S.A., Lausanne-ParisGoogle Scholar
  6. Harding LE (2004) Environmental contaminants in wild martens (Martes Americana) and wolverines (Gulo luscus). Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 73:98–105CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. McDonald RA, Harris S, Turnbull G, Brown P, Fletcher M (1998) anticoagulant rodenticides in stoats (Mustela erminea) and weasels (Mustela nivalis) in England. Environ Pollut 103:17–23CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Merson MH, Byers RE, Kaukeinen DE (1984) Residues of the rodenticide brodifacoum in voles and raptors after orchard treatment. J Wildl Manag 48:212–216CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Shore RF, Birks JDS, Freestone P, Kitchener AC (1996) Second-generation rodenticides and polecats (Mustela putorius) in Britain. Environ Pollut 91:279–282CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Stone WB, Okoniewski JC, Stedelin JR (1999) Poisoning of wildlife with anticoagulant rodenticides in New York. J Wildl Dis 35:187–193Google Scholar
  11. Stone WB, Okoniewski JC, Stedelin JR (2003) Anticoagulant rodenticides and raptors: recent findings from New York, 1998–2001. Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 70:34–40CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Tyuttens FAM, Stuyck JJJM (2002) Effectiveness and efficiency of chlorophacinone poisoning for the control of muskrat (Ondathra zibethicus) populations. New Zealand J Zool 29:33–40Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • O. Lambert
    • 1
  • H. Pouliquen
    • 2
  • M. Larhantec
    • 2
  • C. Thorin
    • 2
  • M. L’Hostis
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre Vétérinaire de la Faune SauvageEcole Nationale Vétérinaire de NantesNantes cedex 03France
  2. 2.Unité de Pharmacologie et ToxicologieEcole Nationale Vétérinaire de NantesNantes cedex 03France

Personalised recommendations