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Quality of life outcome in a randomized controlled trial of case management

  • Peter Huxley
  • Sherrill Evans
  • Tom Burns
  • Tom Fahy
  • John Green
ORIGINAL PAPER

Abstract

Background: This paper presents the quality of life (QOL) outcome results from the UK700 randomised controlled trial of case management. Method: A total of 708 patients with severe mental illness were randomly assigned to intensive and standard forms of case management in four sites in the UK. QOL was assessed using the Lancashire Quality of Life Profile, which provides a self-reported objective and subjective appraisal of eight life domains (finances, work, leisure, family, social relations, living situation, safety and health). The outcome after 2 years was examined using univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: Significant improvements in QOL over the 2 years were observed. The QOL outcome did not differ significantly by case management treatment conditions or by diagnosis. A better outcome was associated with improvements in depression and with the location (site) of treatment. In one site there were significant improvements in all eight domains and overall QOL, with moderate or better effect sizes (> 0.4) in three domains and overall QOL. Conclusions: Depression should be assessed when subjective QOL measures are used. Better means for describing service organisations and the context/place in which they operate should be developed in order to explain more of the variance in QOL outcomes.

Keywords

Mental Illness Case Management Standard Form Social Relation Management Treatment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Steinkopff Verlag 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter Huxley
    • 1
  • Sherrill Evans
    • 1
  • Tom Burns
    • 2
  • Tom Fahy
    • 3
  • John Green
    • 4
  1. 1.School of Psychiatry and Behavioural Sciences, University of Manchester, UKGB
  2. 2.Department of Psychiatry. St. George's Medical School, London, UKGB
  3. 3.Department of Psychiatry, Maudsley Hospital, London, UKGB
  4. 4.Department of Psychiatry, Chelsea and Westminster Health NHS Trust, London, UKGB

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