Individual-level factors associated with mental health in Rwandan youth affected by HIV/AIDS

  • Pamela Scorza
  • Cristiane S. Duarte
  • Anne Stevenson
  • Christine Mushashi
  • Fredrick Kanyanganzi
  • Morris Munyana
  • Theresa S. Betancourt
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00127-017-1364-2

Cite this article as:
Scorza, P., Duarte, C.S., Stevenson, A. et al. Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol (2017). doi:10.1007/s00127-017-1364-2

Abstract

Purpose

Prevention of mental disorders worldwide requires a greater understanding of protective processes associated with lower levels of mental health problems in children who face pervasive life stressors. This study aimed to identify culturally appropriate indicators of individual-level protective factors in Rwandan adolescents where risk factors, namely poverty and a history of trauma, have dramatically shaped youth mental health.

Methods

The sample included 367 youth aged 10–17 in rural Rwanda. An earlier qualitative study of the same population identified the constructs “kwihangana” (patience/perseverance) and “kwigirira ikizere” (self-esteem) as capturing local perceptions of individual-level characteristics that helped reduce risks of mental health problems in youth. Nine items from the locally derived constructs were combined with 25 items from an existing scale that aligned well with local constructs—the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC). We assessed the factor structure of the CD-RISC expanded scale using exploratory factor analysis and determined the correlation of the expanded CD-RISC with depression and functional impairment.

Results

The CD-RISC expanded scale displayed high internal consistency (α = 0.93). Six factors emerged, which we labeled: perseverance, adaptability, strength/sociability, active engagement, self-assuredness, and sense of self-worth. Protective factor scale scores were significantly and inversely correlated with depression and functional impairment (r = −0.49 and r = − 0.38, respectively).

Conclusions

An adapted scale displayed solid psychometric properties for measuring protective factors in Rwandan youth. Identifying culturally appropriate protective factors is a key component of research associated with the prevention of mental health problems and critical to the development of cross-cultural strength-based interventions for children and families.

Keywords

Protective factors Youth Rwanda Mental health Resilience 

Funding information

Funder NameGrant NumberFunding Note
National Institute of Mental Health
  • K01MH077246
  • T32MH096724
Harvard Center for the Developing Child
    Fogarty International Center
    • D43TW009335
    Julie Henry Junior Faculty Development Fund
      The Peter C. Alderman Foundation

        Copyright information

        © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2017

        Authors and Affiliations

        • Pamela Scorza
          • 1
        • Cristiane S. Duarte
          • 1
        • Anne Stevenson
          • 2
        • Christine Mushashi
          • 3
        • Fredrick Kanyanganzi
          • 3
        • Morris Munyana
          • 3
        • Theresa S. Betancourt
          • 4
        1. 1.New York State Psychiatric InstituteColumbia UniversityNew YorkUSA
        2. 2.The Chester M. Pierce, MD Division of Global PsychiatryMassachusetts General HospitalBostonUSA
        3. 3.Partners In Health-Rwanda/Inshuti Mu BuzimaRwinkwavuRwanda
        4. 4.Department of Global Health and PopulationHarvard T. H. Chan School of Public HealthBostonUSA

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