Exposure to aircraft noise and risk of psychiatric disorders: the Elmas survey

Aircraft noise and psychiatric disorders
  • Maria Carolina Hardoy
  • Mauro Giovanni Carta
  • Anna Rita Marci
  • Fiora Carbone
  • Mariangela Cadeddu
  • Viviane Kovess
  • Liliana Dell’Osso
  • Bernardo Carpiniello
ORIGINAL PAPER

Abstract

Background

Evidence that high levels of aircraft noise lead to psychiatric disorders in the community is contradictory. The aim of the present study was to investigate the frequency of mental disorders in a sample living in the immediate surroundings of an airport compared with those from a sample of residents from the same region who had not been exposed to the risk of aircraft noise.

Methods

Exposed subjects were residents in Giliaquas in the vicinity of Elmas airport (Sardinia, Italy). The control sample was drawn from a database of a large community survey, after matching for sex, age and employment status. All subjects were interviewed using a simplified version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview.

Results

Exposed subjects showed a higher frequency of Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Anxiety Disorder Not Otherwise Specified (NOS).

Conclusions

Previous studies generally suggested that high levels of environmental noise are associated with subsyndromal states (psychiatric symptoms) more than with specific syndromes. The present study shows an increased risk for long-lasting syndromal anxiety states (Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Anxiety Disorder NOS), thus supporting the hypothesis of a sustained central autonomic arousal due to chronic exposure to noise.

Key words

aircraft noise community surveys psychiatric disorders mental health environmental noise noise exposure 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    American Psychiatric Association (1994) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition (DSM-IV). American Psychiatric Association, Washington DCGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Carta MG, Carpiniello B, Trudu MN, Tarquini A, Rudas N (1994) La versione italiana della CIDIS: uno studio di accuratezza e riproducibilità. In: Aguglia E, Pascolo E (eds) Metropoli e Oltre. Andrea Tencati Editore, TriesteGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Carta MG, Kovess V, Hardoy MC, Morosini PL, Murgia S, Carpiniello B (2002) Psychiatric disorders in Sardinian emigrants in Paris: a comparison with Parisians and Sardinians resident in Sardinia. Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol 37:112–117CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Hatfield J, Job RF, Carter NL, Peploe P, Taylor R, Morell S (2001) The influence of psychological factors on self-reported physiological effects of noise. Noise Health 3(10):1–13Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Miettinen O (1974) Confounding and effect modification. Am J Epidemiol 100:350–353Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Stansfed SA (1992) Noise, noise sensitivity and psychiatric disorder: epidemiological and psychophysiological studies. Psychol Med 22(Suppl):1–44Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Stansfeld SA,Haines MM, Burr M, Berry B, Lercher P (2000) A review of environmental noise and mental health. Noise Health 2 1–8Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Tarnopolsky A, Watkins G, Hand DJ (1980) Aircraft noise and mental health: I Prevalence of individual symptoms. Psychol Med 10:683–698Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Steinkopff Verlag 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maria Carolina Hardoy
    • 1
    • 2
  • Mauro Giovanni Carta
    • 1
  • Anna Rita Marci
    • 1
  • Fiora Carbone
    • 1
  • Mariangela Cadeddu
    • 1
  • Viviane Kovess
    • 3
  • Liliana Dell’Osso
    • 2
  • Bernardo Carpiniello
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Psychiatry, Dept. of Public HealthUniversity of CagliariCagliariItaly
  2. 2.Dept. of Psychiatry,Neurobiology, Pharmacology, BiotechnologyUniversity of PisaPisaItaly
  3. 3.MGENParisFrance

Personalised recommendations