Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology

, Volume 41, Issue 2, pp 108–114 | Cite as

Suicide mortality in South Africa

A city-level comparison across socio-demographic groups
Original Paper

Abstract

Background

South Africa offers a valuable study environment to assess the impact of political and social changes on health. Increasing urbanisation has led to a focus on city development and its effect on its residents. The study assesses whether sex- and race-specific suicide rates differ across six of South Africa's major cities. Regional differences may reflect varying contextual and individual underlying mechanisms. Those need to be understood for appropriately targeted prevention efforts.

Methods

Suicide mortality data (n=4,946) for the six cities between 2001 and 2003 were used to assess whether there are differences in rates for age-standardised race and sex groups across cities and whether these differences are constant across cities. The overall age-standardised rates for the six cities was 25.3/100,000 for men and 5.6/100,000 for women.

Results

Suicide rates are most often highest among whites and men, but both the magnitude and distribution of suicide vary considerably for different race and sex groups within and across cities. There is a strong association between the method of suicide used and the city.

Conclusions

Despite some common trends in the suicide profile across South African cities, city does matter for the magnitude and distribution of suicide mortality across race and sex groups and for the method of suicide used. The need for locally based suicide research investigating possible reasons for these differences is highlighted.

Key words

suicide mortality South Africa urban socio-demographic groups 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors would like to express their gratitude to the staff at the mortuaries and the MRC/UNISA Lead Programme for Crime, Violence and Injury involved in the data collection and city boundary determinations for the NIMSS.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Dept. of Public Health Sciences, Division of Social MedicineKarolinska InstitutetStockholmSweden
  2. 2.MRC/UNISA Lead Programme on Crime, Violence and InjuryInstitute for Social and Health Sciences and Centre for Peace ActionLenasiaSouth Africa

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