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Urban regeneration and mental health

  • Peter Huxley
  • Sherrill Evans
  • M. Leese
  • C. Gately
  • Anne Rogers
  • R. Thomas
  • B. Robson
ORIGINAL PAPER

Abstract.

Objective:

The aim of this study was to assess the impact of an urban regeneration project on mental health.

Method:

A longitudinal study was made with 22-month follow-up in a Single Regeneration Budget area, and matched control area in South Manchester. A total of 1344 subjects responded to a postal questionnaire survey. The main outcome measures were GHQ12 (mental health) status, MANSA (Life satisfaction), and GP use.

Results:

Mental health outcome in the index and control areas showed no improvement over time. Health satisfaction declined slightly in the index compared to the control area. GP use was unchanged. Restricted opportunities, a variable closely related to mental health, were not removed by the urban regeneration initiative.

Conclusions:

The urban regeneration initiative may have had little impact because it failed to address the concerns of local residents and failed to remove restricted opportunities, which appeared to be the key factor. A longer follow-up period may be required to demonstrate an effect.

Key words

mental health urban regeneration restricted opportunities 

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Copyright information

© Steinkopff Verlag 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter Huxley
    • 1
  • Sherrill Evans
    • 1
  • M. Leese
    • 1
  • C. Gately
    • 1
  • Anne Rogers
    • 2
  • R. Thomas
    • 3
  • B. Robson
    • 3
  1. 1.Health Services Research Dept., Institute of PsychiatryKing’s CollegeLondon SE5 8AFUK
  2. 2.Dept. of General PracticeUniversity of ManchesterManchesterUK
  3. 3.Dept. of GeographyUniversity of ManchesterManchesterUK

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