Diabetologia

, Volume 40, Issue 8, pp 963–970

Familial components of the multiple metabolic syndrome: the ARIC Study

  • A. D. Liese
  • E. J. Mayer-Davis
  • H. A. Tyroler
  • C. E. Davis
  • U. Keil
  • M. I. Schmidt
  • F. L. Brancati
  • G. Heiss

Summary

The association of a parental history of diabetes mellitus and hypertension with the multiple metabolic syndrome (MMS) was studied in a population survey of middle-aged adults. The eligible population was drawn from the baseline examination of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study, a population-based, bi-ethnic, multi-centre cohort study. The MMS was defined as a multivariate, categorical phenotype of co-occurring diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidaemia. MMS cases (n = 356) were compared to disorder-free control subjects (n = 6797) with respect to their parental history of diabetes and hypertension. MMS cases were more likely to report a history of diabetes in both parents (odds ratio [OR] 4.7, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.5–14.7) or a history of hypertension in both parents (OR 1.9, 95 % CI 1.1–3.0) than control subjects, adjusting for BMI, waist-to-hip ratio, age, gender, and ethnicity/centre. A parental history of diabetes and hypertension in both parents was associated with the greatest increase in odds of MMS (OR 8.3, 95 % CI 3.0–22.8). A dose-response relationship between the number of parental disorders (one; two; three to four) and the odds of MMS was observed (OR 1.2, 95 % CI 0.9–1.7; OR 2.0, 95 % CI 1.4–2.8; OR 4.0, 95 % CI 2.5–6.2). Based on the marked associations observed between a parental history of MMS components and the clustering of these metabolic disorders in the offspring generation, we conclude that genetic and/or non-genetic familial influences play a role in the development of the multiple metabolic syndrome. [Diabetologia (1997) 40: 963–970]

Keywords Parental history insulin resistance syndrome non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus hypertension. 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. D. Liese
    • 1
  • E. J. Mayer-Davis
    • 2
  • H. A. Tyroler
    • 3
  • C. E. Davis
    • 4
  • U. Keil
    • 1
  • M. I. Schmidt
    • 5
  • F. L. Brancati
    • 6
  • G. Heiss
    • 3
  1. 1.Institute of Epidemiology and Social Medicine, University of Münster, Münster, GermanyDE
  2. 2.Department of Public Health Sciences, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USAUS
  3. 3.Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USAUS
  4. 4.Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USAUS
  5. 5.Department of Social Medicine, School of Medicine, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, BrasilXX
  6. 6.Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology and Clinical Research, The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland, USATP

Personalised recommendations