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Diabetologia

, Volume 57, Issue 3, pp 647–649 | Cite as

Detection of enterovirus in the islet cells of patients with type 1 diabetes: what do we learn from immunohistochemistry? Reply to Hansson SF, Korsgren S, Pontén F et al [letter]

  • Sarah J. RichardsonEmail author
  • Pia Leete
  • Shalinee Dhayal
  • Mark A. Russell
  • Maarit Oikarinen
  • Jutta E. Laiho
  • Emma Svedin
  • Katharina Lind
  • Therese Rosenling
  • Nora Chapman
  • Adrian J. Bone
  • Alan K. Foulis
  • Gun Frisk
  • Malin Flodström-Tullberg
  • Didier Hober
  • Heikki Hyoty
  • Alberto Pugliese
  • Noel G. MorganEmail author
Letter

We are grateful to Hansson et al [1] for their endorsement of the conclusions reached following our recent evaluation of the fidelity of immunolabelling achieved with clone 5D8/1 in human pancreas [2]. Nevertheless, we would differ in that we do not consider that a ‘one size fits all’ approach to immunolabelling should be adopted when using this antibody. This is because optimal immunolabelling is determined not only by the features of the antibody, but also by the quality and preservation of the tissue under study. In our experience, when using tissue that has been recovered and processed according to recently adopted Standard Operating Procedures, such as those used within the JDRF Network for Pancreatic Organ Donors with Diabetes (nPOD) programme [3], then a high dilution (e.g. 1:2,000) of clone 5D8/1 can be employed to achieve optimal, selective immunolabelling of viral antigen. However, for those historical collections in which tissue samples were recovered at autopsy and then...

Keywords

ATP5B Beta cell Clone 5D8/1 Coxsackievirus Creatine kinase B Islet VP1 

Abbreviations

CKB

Creatine kinase B

nPOD

Network of Pancreatic Organ Donors with Diabetes

Notes

Funding

The work was supported by funding from the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme PEVNET (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement number 261441. Additional support was from a Diabetes Research Wellness Foundation Non-Clinical Research Fellowship to SJR and from Karolinska Institutet (KL), the Strategic Research Programme in Diabetes at Karolinska Institutet (MF-T) and the Swedish Research Council (MF-T). The research was also performed with the support of the Network for Pancreatic Organ Donors with Diabetes (nPOD), a collaborative type 1 diabetes research project sponsored by the JDRF and with a JDRF research grant awarded to the nPOD-V Consortium. Organ procurement organisations (OPO) partnering with nPOD to provide research resources are listed at www.jdrfnpod.org/our-partners.php.

Duality of interest

HH is a minor (<5%) shareholder and member of the board of Vactech, which develops vaccines against picornaviruses. All other authors declare that there is no duality of interest associated with this manuscript.

Contribution statement

All authors were responsible for the conception and design of the manuscript and revising it critically for important intellectual content. All authors approved the version to be published.

References

  1. 1.
    Hansson SF, Korsgren S, Pontén F, Korsgren O (2013) Detection of enterovirus in the islet cells of patients with type 1 diabetes: what do we learn from immunohistochemistry? Diabetologia. doi: 10.1007/s00125-013-3138-z PubMedGoogle Scholar
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    Richardson SJ, Leete P, Dhayal S et al (2013) Evaluation of the fidelity of immunolabelling obtained with clone 5D8/1, a monoclonal antibody directed against the enteroviral capsid protein, VP1, in human pancreas. Diabetologia. doi: 10.1007/s00125-013-3094-7 Google Scholar
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    Campbell-Thompson M, Wasserfall C, Kaddis J et al (2012) Network for Pancreatic Organ Donors with Diabetes (nPOD): developing a tissue biobank for type 1 diabetes. Diabetes Metab Res Rev 28:608–617PubMedCentralPubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Flodström-Tullberg M, Hultcrantz M, Stotland A et al (2005) RNase L and double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase exert complementary roles in islet cell defense during coxsackievirus infection. J Immunol 174:1171–1177PubMedGoogle Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sarah J. Richardson
    • 1
    Email author
  • Pia Leete
    • 1
  • Shalinee Dhayal
    • 1
  • Mark A. Russell
    • 1
  • Maarit Oikarinen
    • 2
  • Jutta E. Laiho
    • 2
  • Emma Svedin
    • 3
  • Katharina Lind
    • 3
  • Therese Rosenling
    • 4
  • Nora Chapman
    • 5
  • Adrian J. Bone
    • 6
  • Alan K. Foulis
    • 7
  • Gun Frisk
    • 4
  • Malin Flodström-Tullberg
    • 3
  • Didier Hober
    • 8
  • Heikki Hyoty
    • 2
    • 9
  • Alberto Pugliese
    • 10
  • Noel G. Morgan
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Institute of Biomedical and Clinical SciencesUniversity of Exeter Medical SchoolExeterUK
  2. 2.Department of Virology, Medical SchoolUniversity of TampereTampereFinland
  3. 3.Department of Medicine HS, The Center for Infectious MedicineKarolinska InstitutetStockholmSweden
  4. 4.Division of Immunology, Genetics and PathologyUppsala UniversityUppsalaSweden
  5. 5.Department of Pathology and MicrobiologyUniversity of Nebraska Medical CentreOmahaUSA
  6. 6.School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular SciencesUniversity of BrightonBrightonUK
  7. 7.GG&C Pathology DepartmentSouthern General HospitalGlasgowUK
  8. 8.CHRU Lille Laboratory of Virology EA3610University Lille 2LilleFrance
  9. 9.Fimlab LaboratoriesTampereFinland
  10. 10.Diabetes Research InstituteUniversity of Miami Miller School of MedicineMiamiUSA

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