Theoretical and Applied Genetics

, Volume 102, Issue 4, pp 524–530

A candidate gene approach identified phytoene synthase as the locus for mature fruit color in red pepper (Capsicum spp.)

  • J. H. Huh
  • B. C. Kang
  • S. H. Nahm
  • S. Kim
  • K. S. Ha
  • M. H. Lee
  • B. D. Kim
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s001220051677

Cite this article as:
Huh, J., Kang, B., Nahm, S. et al. Theor Appl Genet (2001) 102: 524. doi:10.1007/s001220051677

Abstrat 

The color of mature pepper fruit is determined by the composition of carotenoids. The fruit color of red pepper is genetically determined by three loci, y, c1, and c2. We have been developing a genetic map of hot pepper using RFLP and AFLP markers in the F2 population of an interspecific cross between Capsicum annuum cv TF68 and Capsicum chinense cv Habanero. The color of the ripe fruit of TF68 is red and Habanero is orange. The red color is dominant over orange in the F1 and the locus controlling this character has been marked in our SNU Linkage Group 7. To identify the gene or markers tightly linked to the red/orange locus, several candidate genes involved in the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway, namely FPS, GGPS, PSY, PDS, LCY and CCS, were examined. One of the candidate genes, phytoene synthase, cosegregated completely with fruit color in the F2 population. QTL analysis of the pigment content of F2 individuals quantified by HPLC also indicated that phytoene synthase is the locus responsible for the development of fruit color. The color, pigment content and genetic behavior of Habanero also suggest that phytoene synthase may be responsible for the c2 gene discriminating between red and orange cultivars.

Keywords Candidate gene Capsicum Carotenoid phytoene synthase QTL 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. H. Huh
    • 1
  • B. C. Kang
    • 1
  • S. H. Nahm
    • 1
  • S. Kim
    • 2
  • K. S. Ha
    • 2
  • M. H. Lee
    • 3
  • B. D. Kim
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Horticulture, and the Center for Plant Molecular Genetics and Breeding Research, Seoul National University, Suwon 441-744, Korea e-mail: kimbd@snu.ac.krKR
  2. 2.Biomolecule Research Team, Korea Basic Science Institute, Taejon 305–333, KoreaKR
  3. 3.Jung-Bu Breeding and Research Station, Hung-Nong Seed Co., Eumsung 369–830, KoreaKR

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