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Theoretical and Applied Genetics

, Volume 128, Issue 6, pp 1061–1072 | Cite as

Marker-assisted breeding for transgressive seed protein content in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.]

  • Ying Hu Zhang
  • Mei Feng Liu
  • Jian Bo He
  • Yu Feng Wang
  • Guang Nan Xing
  • Yan Li
  • Shou Ping Yang
  • Tuan Jie Zhao
  • Jun Yi Gai
Original Paper

Abstract

Key message

After two cycles of marker-assisted breeding on three loci, lines with transgressive segregation of 8.22–9.32 % protein content were developed based on four original soybean parents with 35.35–44.83 % protein content.

Abstract

Marker-assisted breeding has been an innovative approach in conventional breeding, which is to be further demonstrated, especially for quantitative traits. A study on continuous transgressive breeding for seed protein content (SPC) in soybean using marker-assisted procedures is reported here. The SPC of the recombinant inbred line (RIL) population XG varied in 38.04–47.54 % under five environments with P 1 of 35.35 %, P 2 of 44.34 % and total heritability of 89.11 %. A transgressive segregant XG30 with SPC 45.53 % was selected for further improvement. The linkage mapping of XG showed its genetic constitution composed of five additive QTL (32.16 % of phenotypic variation or PV) and two pairs of epistatic QTL (2.96 % PV) using 400 SSR markers with the remnant heritability 53.99 % attributed to the undetected collective of minor QTL. Another transgressive segregant WT133 with SPC 48.39 % was selected from the RIL population WT (44.83 % SPC for both parents). XG30 and WT133 were genotyped on the three major additive QTL (Prot-08-1, Prot-14-1 and Prot-19-2) as A 2 A 2 B 2 B 2 L 1 L 1 and A 1 A 1 B 1 B 1 L 2 L 2 , respectively. From WT133×XG30, surprising transgressive progenies were obtained, among which the recombinants with all three positive alleles A 2 _B 2 _L 2 _ performed the highest SPC, especially that of Prot-08-1. The five F 2-derived superior families showed their means higher than the high parent value in F 2:3 and F 2:4 and more transgressive effect in F 2:5:6, with the highest as high as 54.15 %, or 4.82 and 9.32 % more than WT133 and its original high parent, respectively. This study demonstrated the efficiency of marker-assisted procedure in breeding for transgressive segregation of quantitative trait.

Keywords

Recombinant Inbred Line Population Transgressive Segregation Wild Soybean Positive Allele Seed Protein Content 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

This research was supported by the National Key Basic Research Program of China (2011CB1093), the National Hightech R&D Program of China (2011AA10A105, 2012AA101106), the MOE 111 Project (B08025), the MOE Program for Changjiang Scholars and Innovative Research Team in University (PCSIRT13073), the MOA Public Profit Program (201203026-4), the Jiangsu Higher Education PAPD Program and the Jiangsu JCIC-MCP program.

Conflict of interest

The authors have declared that no competing or conflicts of interest exist.

Supplementary material

122_2015_2490_MOESM1_ESM.doc (195 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOC 195 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ying Hu Zhang
    • 1
  • Mei Feng Liu
    • 1
  • Jian Bo He
    • 1
  • Yu Feng Wang
    • 1
  • Guang Nan Xing
    • 1
  • Yan Li
    • 1
  • Shou Ping Yang
    • 1
  • Tuan Jie Zhao
    • 1
  • Jun Yi Gai
    • 1
  1. 1.Soybean Research Institute, Nanjing Agricultural University; National Center for Soybean Improvement, Ministry of Agriculture; Key Laboratory of Biology and Genetic Improvement of Soybean, Ministry of Agriculture; National Key Laboratory for Crop Genetics and Germplasm EnhancementNanjing Agricultural UniversityNanjingChina

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