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Theoretical and Applied Genetics

, Volume 128, Issue 3, pp 517–528 | Cite as

Identification and genetic mapping of the putative Thinopyrum intermedium-derived dominant powdery mildew resistance gene PmL962 on wheat chromosome arm 2BS

  • X. K. Shen
  • L. X. Ma
  • S. F. Zhong
  • N. Liu
  • M. Zhang
  • W. Q. Chen
  • Y. L. Zhou
  • H. J. Li
  • Z. J. Chang
  • X. Li
  • G. H. Bai
  • H. Y. Zhang
  • F. Q. Tan
  • Z. L. Ren
  • P. G. LuoEmail author
Original Paper

Abstract

Key message

Powdery resistance putatively derived from Thinopyrum intermedium in the wheat line L962 is controlled by a single dominant gene designated PmL962 and mapped to chromosome arm 2BS.

Abstract

Powdery mildew, caused by Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici (Bgt), is a destructive disease affecting the production of wheat (Triticum aestivum). Powdery mildew resistance was putatively transferred from Thinopyrum intermedium to the common wheat line L962, which conferred resistance to multiple Chinese Bgt isolates. Genetic analysis of the powdery mildew response was conducted by crossing the resistant line L962 with the susceptible line L983. Disease assessments of the F1, F2, and F2:3 populations from the cross L983/L962 indicated that resistance was controlled by a single dominant gene. A total of 373 F2:3 lines and 781 pairs of genomic simple sequence repeat (SSR) primers were employed to determine the chromosomal location of the resistance gene. The gene was linked to four publicly available and recently developed wheat genomic SSR markers and seven EST-STS markers. The resistance gene was mapped to chromosome arm 2BS based on the locations of the linked markers. Pedigree, molecular marker and resistance response data indicated that the powdery mildew resistance gene in L962 is novel. It was temporarily designated PmL962. It is flanked by Xwmc314 and BE443737at genetic distances of 2.09 and 3.74 cM, respectively, and located in a 20.77 cM interval that is co-linear with a 269.4 kb genomic region on chromosome 5 in Brachypodium distachyon and a 223.5 kb genomic region on rice (Oryza sativa) chromosome 4. The markers that are closely linked to this gene have potential applications in marker-assisted breeding.

Keywords

Powdery Mildew Simple Sequence Repeat Marker Fusarium Head Blight Stripe Rust Simple Sequence Repeat Locus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

Financial support was provided by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (31271721), the Provincial Science and Technology Foundation for Young Scientists of Sichuan China (2010JQ0042), the State Key Laboratory for Biology of Plant Disease and Insect Pests, China (SKLOF201410), the Specific Foundation of Agronomy (No. nyhyzx3-15, 201303016), the Key Project of the Education Ministry of China (2012146), and the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (2011CB100403 and 2013CB127701). We are grateful to Dr. R. A. McIntosh (University of Sydney, Australia) and Dr. X. C. Xia [Institute of Crop Science at the National Wheat Improvement Centre of The National Key Facility for Crop Gene Resources and Genetic Improvement of the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences (CAAS) in Beijing, China] for critically reviewing drafts of this paper. We are also grateful to Prof Z. Y. Liu, College of Agriculture and Biotechnology, China Agricultural University, Beijing, for providing many useful suggestions and discussing the manuscript.

Conflict of interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Supplementary material

122_2014_2449_MOESM1_ESM.docx (24 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 24 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • X. K. Shen
    • 1
    • 2
  • L. X. Ma
    • 2
  • S. F. Zhong
    • 2
  • N. Liu
    • 2
  • M. Zhang
    • 2
  • W. Q. Chen
    • 1
  • Y. L. Zhou
    • 1
  • H. J. Li
    • 3
  • Z. J. Chang
    • 4
  • X. Li
    • 2
  • G. H. Bai
    • 5
  • H. Y. Zhang
    • 2
  • F. Q. Tan
    • 2
  • Z. L. Ren
    • 2
  • P. G. Luo
    • 1
    • 2
    • 5
    Email author
  1. 1.State Key Laboratory for Biology of Plant Diseases and Insect Pests, Institute of Plant ProtectionChinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences (CAAS)BeijingChina
  2. 2.Provincial Key Laboratory of Plant Breeding and GeneticsSichuan Agricultural UniversityChengduChina
  3. 3.The National Key Facility for Crop Gene Resources and Genetic Improvement (NFCRI)Institute of Crop Science, Chinese Academy of Agricultural SciencesBeijingChina
  4. 4.Institute of Crop GeneticsShanxi Academy of Agricultural ScienceTaiyuanChina
  5. 5.Hard Winter Wheat Genetics Research Unit, USDA-ARSManhattanUSA

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