Theoretical and Applied Genetics

, Volume 122, Issue 2, pp 317–325

Mapping of the oat crown rust resistance gene Pc91

  • C. A. McCartney
  • R. G. Stonehouse
  • B. G. Rossnagel
  • P. E. Eckstein
  • G. J. Scoles
  • T. Zatorski
  • A. D. Beattie
  • J. Chong
Original Paper

Abstract

Crown rust is an important disease of oat caused by Puccinia coronata Corda f. sp. avenae Eriks. Crown rust is efficiently and effectively managed through the development of resistant oat varieties. Pc91 is a seedling crown rust resistance gene that is highly effective against the current P. coronata population in North America. The primary objective of this study was to develop DNA markers linked to Pc91 for purposes of marker-assisted selection in oat breeding programs. The Pc91 locus was mapped using a population of F7-derived recombinant inbred lines developed from the cross ‘CDC Sol-Fi’/‘HiFi’ made at the Crop Development Centre, University of Saskatchewan. The population was evaluated for reaction to P. coronata in field nurseries in 2008 and 2009. Pc91 mapped to a linkage group consisting of 44 Diversity Array Technology (DArT) markers. DArTs were successfully converted to sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers. Five robust SCARs were developed from three non-redundant DArTs that co-segregated with Pc91. SCAR markers were developed for different assay systems, such that SCARs are available for agarose gel electrophoresis, capillary electrophoresis, and Taqman single nucleotide polymorphism detection. The SCAR markers accurately postulated the Pc91 status of 23 North American oat breeding lines.

Supplementary material

122_2010_1448_MOESM1_ESM.xls (25 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (XLS 25 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. A. McCartney
    • 1
  • R. G. Stonehouse
    • 1
  • B. G. Rossnagel
    • 1
  • P. E. Eckstein
    • 2
  • G. J. Scoles
    • 2
  • T. Zatorski
    • 1
  • A. D. Beattie
    • 1
  • J. Chong
    • 3
  1. 1.Crop Development CentreUniversity of SaskatchewanSaskatoonCanada
  2. 2.Department of Plant SciencesUniversity of SaskatchewanSaskatoonCanada
  3. 3.Cereal Research CentreAgriculture and Agri-Food CanadaWinnipegCanada

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