Theoretical and Applied Genetics

, Volume 120, Issue 1, pp 117–126

Identification and characterization of a novel host–toxin interaction in the wheat–Stagonospora nodorum pathosystem

  • Nilwala S. Abeysekara
  • Timothy L. Friesen
  • Beat Keller
  • Justin D. Faris
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00122-009-1163-6

Cite this article as:
Abeysekara, N.S., Friesen, T.L., Keller, B. et al. Theor Appl Genet (2009) 120: 117. doi:10.1007/s00122-009-1163-6

Abstract

Stagonospora nodorum, casual agent of Stagonospora nodorum blotch (SNB) of wheat, produces a number of host-selective toxins (HSTs) known to be important in disease. To date, four HSTs and corresponding host sensitivity genes have been reported, and all four host–toxin interactions are significant factors in the development of disease. Here, we describe the identification and partial characterization of a fifth S. nodorum produced HST designated SnTox4. The toxin, estimated to be 10–30 kDa in size, was found to be proteinaceous in nature. Sensitivity to SnTox4 is governed by a single dominant gene, designated Snn4, which mapped to the short arm of wheat chromosome 1A in a recombinant inbred (RI) population. The compatible Snn4–SnTox4 interaction is light dependent and results in a mottled necrotic reaction, which is different from the severe necrosis that results from other host–toxin interactions in the wheat–S. nodorum pathosystem. QTL analysis in a population of 200 RI lines derived from the Swiss winter wheat varieties Arina and Forno revealed a major QTL for SNB susceptibility that coincided with the Snn4 locus. This QTL, designated QSnb.fcu-1A, explained 41.0% of the variation in disease on leaves of seedlings indicating that a compatible Snn4–SnTox4 interaction plays a major role in the development of SNB in this population. Additional minor QTL detected on the short arms of chromosomes 2A and 3A accounted for 5.4 and 6.0% of the variation, respectively. The effects of the three QTL were largely additive, and together they explained 50% of the total phenotypic variation. These results provide further evidence that host–toxin interactions in the wheat–S. nodorum pathosystem follow an inverse gene-for-gene model.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nilwala S. Abeysekara
    • 1
  • Timothy L. Friesen
    • 2
  • Beat Keller
    • 3
  • Justin D. Faris
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Plant SciencesNorth Dakota State UniversityFargoUSA
  2. 2.Northern Crop Science LaboratoryUSDA-ARS Cereal Crops Research UnitFargoUSA
  3. 3.Institute of Plant BiologyUniversity of ZürichZurichSwitzerland

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