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Theoretical and Applied Genetics

, Volume 120, Issue 1, pp 71–83 | Cite as

Genetic map construction and QTL mapping of resistance to blackleg (Leptosphaeria maculans) disease in Australian canola (Brassica napus L.) cultivars

  • S. Kaur
  • N. O. I. Cogan
  • G. Ye
  • R. C. Baillie
  • M. L. Hand
  • A. E. Ling
  • A. K. Mcgearey
  • J. Kaur
  • C. J. Hopkins
  • M. Todorovic
  • H. Mountford
  • D. Edwards
  • J. Batley
  • W. Burton
  • P. Salisbury
  • N. Gororo
  • S. Marcroft
  • G. Kearney
  • K. F. Smith
  • J. W. Forster
  • G. C. Spangenberg
Original Paper

Abstract

Genetic map construction and identification of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for blackleg resistance were performed for four mapping populations derived from five different canola source cultivars. Three of the populations were generated from crosses between single genotypes from the blackleg-resistant cultivars Caiman, Camberra and AVSapphire and the blackleg-susceptible cultivar Westar10. The fourth population was derived from a cross between genotypes from two blackleg resistant varieties (Rainbow and AVSapphire). Different types of DNA-based markers were designed and characterised from a collection of 20,000 EST sequences generated from multiple Brassica species, including a new set of 445 EST-SSR markers of high value to the international community. Multiple molecular genetic marker systems were used to construct linkage maps with locus numbers varying between 219 and 468, and coverage ranging from 1173 to 1800 cM. The proportion of polymorphic markers assigned to map locations varied from 70 to 89% across the four populations. Publicly available simple sequence repeat markers were used to assign linkage groups to reference nomenclature, and a sub-set of mapped markers were also screened on the Tapidor × Ningyou (T × N) reference population to assist this process. QTL analysis was performed based on percentage survival at low and high disease pressure sites. Multiple QTLs were identified across the four mapping populations, accounting for 13–33% of phenotypic variance (V p). QTL-linked marker data are suitable for implementation in breeding for disease resistance in Australian canola cultivars. However, the likelihood of shifts in pathogen race structure across different geographical locations may have implications for the long-term durability of such associations.

Keywords

Amplify Fragment Length Polymorphism Mapping Population Double Haploid Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Marker Composite Interval Mapping 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by funding from the Grains Research and Development Corporation.

Supplementary material

122_2009_1160_MOESM1_ESM.xls (126 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (XLS 126 kb) SSR marker primer pair summary data
122_2009_1160_MOESM2_ESM.xls (28 kb)
Supplementary material 2 (XLS 28 kb) SNP marker amplification and interrogation primer summary data
122_2009_1160_MOESM3_ESM.xls (409 kb)
Supplementary material 3 (XLS 409 kb) Genotypic scoring matrices for the Caiman3 × Westar10, Camberra4 × Westar10, AVSapphire5 × Westar10 and Rainbow4 × AVSapphire5 mapping populations, incorporating information on informative, high quality scaffold reference markers used in QTL map analyses
122_2009_1160_MOESM4_ESM.xls (362 kb)
Supplementary material 4 (XLS 361 kb) Genotypic scoring matrices for the Caiman3 × Westar10, Camberra4 × Westar10, AVSapphire5 × Westar10 and Rainbow4 × AVSapphire5 mapping populations, incorporating information on informative, high quality scaffold reference markers used in QTL map analyses
122_2009_1160_MOESM5_ESM.xls (580 kb)
Supplementary material 5 (XLS 579 kb) Genotypic scoring matrices for the Caiman3 × Westar10, Camberra4 × Westar10, AVSapphire5 × Westar10 and Rainbow4 × AVSapphire5 mapping populations, incorporating information on informative, high quality scaffold reference markers used in QTL map analyses
122_2009_1160_MOESM6_ESM.xls (250 kb)
Supplementary material 6 (XLS 250 kb) Genotypic scoring matrices for the Caiman3 × Westar10, Camberra4 × Westar10, AVSapphire5 × Westar10 and Rainbow4 × AVSapphire5 mapping populations, incorporating information on informative, high quality scaffold reference markers used in QTL map analyses
122_2009_1160_MOESM7_ESM.ppt (356 kb)
Supplementary material 7 (PPT 356 kb) Schematic depicting genetic map structure for the Caiman3 × Westar10 mapping population
122_2009_1160_MOESM8_ESM.ppt (381 kb)
Supplementary material 8 (PPT 381 kb) Schematic depicting genetic map structure for the Camberra4 × Westar10 mapping population
122_2009_1160_MOESM9_ESM.ppt (304 kb)
Supplementary material 9 (PPT 303 kb) Schematic depicting genetic map structure for the AVSapphire5 × Westar10 mapping population
122_2009_1160_MOESM10_ESM.ppt (208 kb)
Supplementary material 10 (PPT 208 kb) Schematic depicting genetic map structure for the Rainbow4 × AVSapphire5 mapping population
122_2009_1160_MOESM11_ESM.doc (35 kb)
Supplementary material 11 (DOC 35 kb) Summary information on genetic map locations and flanking markers in the T × N population, as described in ESM1
122_2009_1160_MOESM12_ESM.ppt (1.2 mb)
Supplementary material 12 (PPT 1197 kb) Frequency histograms for the phenotypic data generated from trials performed at the Dahlen and Lake Bolac blackleg infection nurseries. Common scales for percentage survival are used for all populations apart from Sapphire5 × Westar10, because of higher variation for recorded data
122_2009_1160_MOESM13_ESM.txt (11.8 mb)
Supplementary material 13 (TXT 12117 kb) All Brassica EST DNA sequences analysed for SSR and SNP discovery in this study, in a single concatenated FASTA format text file. Heading line includes details of source material and species of origin and cDNA synthesis method used

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Kaur
    • 1
  • N. O. I. Cogan
    • 1
  • G. Ye
    • 1
  • R. C. Baillie
    • 1
  • M. L. Hand
    • 1
  • A. E. Ling
    • 1
  • A. K. Mcgearey
    • 1
  • J. Kaur
    • 1
  • C. J. Hopkins
    • 1
    • 8
  • M. Todorovic
    • 1
  • H. Mountford
    • 1
  • D. Edwards
    • 1
    • 6
  • J. Batley
    • 1
    • 7
  • W. Burton
    • 2
  • P. Salisbury
    • 2
  • N. Gororo
    • 2
    • 5
  • S. Marcroft
    • 2
    • 4
  • G. Kearney
    • 3
  • K. F. Smith
    • 3
  • J. W. Forster
    • 1
  • G. C. Spangenberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Biosciences Research Division, Department of Primary IndustriesVictorian AgriBiosciences CentreBundooraAustralia
  2. 2.Biosciences Research Division, Department of Primary IndustriesHorsham CentreHorshamAustralia
  3. 3.Biosciences Research Division, Department of Primary IndustriesHamilton CentreHamiltonAustralia
  4. 4.Marcroft Grains PathologyHorshamAustralia
  5. 5.Nuseed Pty LtdHorshamAustralia
  6. 6.Australian Centre for Plant Functional Genomics, Institute for Molecular Biosciences and School of Land, Crop and Food SciencesUniversity of QueenslandBrisbaneAustralia
  7. 7.ARC Centre of Excellence for Integrative Legume Research and School of Land, Crop and Food SciencesUniversity of QueenslandBrisbaneAustralia
  8. 8.Rothamstead ResearchHarpendenUK

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