BAC-derived markers converted from RFLP linked to Phytophthora capsici resistance in pepper (Capsicum annuum L.)

  • Hyoun-Joung Kim
  • Seok-Hyeon Nahm
  • Heung-Ryul Lee
  • Gi-Bo Yoon
  • Ki-Taek Kim
  • Byoung-Cheorl Kang
  • Doil Choi
  • Oh Yeol Kweon
  • Myeong-Cheoul Cho
  • Jin-Kyung Kwon
  • Jung-Heon Han
  • Jeong-Ho Kim
  • MinKyu Park
  • Jong Hwa Ahn
  • Soon Ho Choi
  • Nam Han Her
  • Joo-Hee Sung
  • Byung-Dong Kim
Original Paper

Abstract

Phytophthora capsici Leonian, an oomycete pathogen, is a serious problem in pepper worldwide. Its resistance in pepper is controlled by quantitative trait loci (QTL). To detect QTL associated with P. capsici resistance, a molecular linkage map was constructed using 100 F2 individuals from a cross between Capsicum annuum ‘CM334’ and C. annuum ‘Chilsungcho’. This linkage map consisted of 202 restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs), 6 WRKYs and 1 simple sequence repeat (SSR) covering 1482.3 cM, with an average interval marker distance of 7.09 cM. QTL mapping of Phytophthora root rot and damping-off resistance was performed in F2:3 originated from a cross between resistant Mexican landrace C. annuum ‘CM334’ and susceptible Korean landrace C. annuum ‘Chilsungcho’ using composite interval mapping (CIM) analysis. Four QTL explained 66.3% of the total phenotypic variations for root rot resistance and three 44.9% for damping-off resistance. Of these QTL loci, two were located close to RFLP markers CDI25 on chromosome 5 (P5) and CT211A on P9. A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library from C. annuum ‘CM334’ was screened with these two RFLP probes to obtain sequence information around the RFLP marker loci for development of PCR-based markers. CDI25 and CT211 probes identified seven and eight BAC clones, respectively. Nine positive BAC clones containing probe regions were sequenced and used for cytogenetic analysis. One single-nucleotide amplified polymorphism (SNAP) for the CDI25 locus, and two SSRs and cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) for CT211 were developed using sequences of the positive BAC clones. These markers will be valuable for rapid selection of genotypes and map-based cloning for resistance genes against P. capsici.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hyoun-Joung Kim
    • 1
  • Seok-Hyeon Nahm
    • 1
    • 7
  • Heung-Ryul Lee
    • 1
  • Gi-Bo Yoon
    • 1
  • Ki-Taek Kim
    • 2
  • Byoung-Cheorl Kang
    • 1
  • Doil Choi
    • 1
  • Oh Yeol Kweon
    • 3
  • Myeong-Cheoul Cho
    • 2
  • Jin-Kyung Kwon
    • 4
  • Jung-Heon Han
    • 4
  • Jeong-Ho Kim
    • 4
    • 8
  • MinKyu Park
    • 4
  • Jong Hwa Ahn
    • 1
  • Soon Ho Choi
    • 5
  • Nam Han Her
    • 5
  • Joo-Hee Sung
    • 1
  • Byung-Dong Kim
    • 1
    • 4
    • 6
  1. 1.Department of Plant ScienceSeoul National UniversitySeoulSouth Korea
  2. 2.Vegetable Research DivisionNational Horticultural Research InstituteSuwonSouth Korea
  3. 3.National Agricultural Cooperative FederationAnsungSouth Korea
  4. 4.Center for Plant Molecular Genetics and Breeding ResearchSeoul National UniversitySeoulSouth Korea
  5. 5.Division of Research and DevelopmentNongwoo Bio Co.GyeonggiSouth Korea
  6. 6.Research Institute for Agriculture and Life SciencesSeoul National UniversitySeoulSouth Korea
  7. 7.Biotechnology InstituteNongwoo Bio Co.GyeonggiSouth Korea
  8. 8.Vegetable Research DivisionNational Horticultural Research InstituteSuwonSouth Korea

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