Theoretical and Applied Genetics

, Volume 117, Issue 3, pp 307–312 | Cite as

Genetic mapping of adult plant leaf rust resistance genes Lr48 and Lr49 in common wheat

  • U. K. Bansal
  • M. J. Hayden
  • B. P. Venkata
  • R. Khanna
  • R. G. Saini
  • H. S. Bariana
Original Paper

Abstract

Hypersensitive adult plant resistance genes Lr48 and Lr49 were named based on their genetic independence of the known adult plant resistance genes. This study was planned to determine genomic locations of these genes. Recombinant inbred line populations derived from crosses involving CSP44 and VL404, sources of Lr48 and Lr49, respectively, and the susceptible parent WL711, were used to determine the genomic locations of these genes. Bulked segregant analyses were performed using multiplex-ready PCR technology. Lr48 in genotype CSP44 was mapped on chromosome arm 2BS flanked by marker loci Xgwm429b (6.1 cM) and Xbarc7 (7.3 cM) distally and proximally, respectively. Leaf rust resistance gene Lr13, carried by the alternate parent WL711, was proximal to Lr48 and was flanked by Xksm58 (5.1 cM) and Xstm773-2 (8.7 cM). Lr49 was flanked by Xbarc163 (8.1 cM) and Xwmc349 (10.1 cM) on chromosome arm 4BL. The likely presence of the durable leaf rust resistance gene Lr34 in both CSP44 and VL404 was confirmed using the tightly linked marker csLV34. Near-isogenic lines for Lr48 and Lr49 were developed in cultivar Lal Bahadur. Genotypes combining Lr13 and/or Lr34 with Lr48 or Lr49 were identified as potential donor sources for cultivar development programs.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • U. K. Bansal
    • 1
  • M. J. Hayden
    • 2
  • B. P. Venkata
    • 1
  • R. Khanna
    • 3
  • R. G. Saini
    • 3
  • H. S. Bariana
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Natural ResourcesUniversity of Sydney PBI-CobbittyCamdenAustralia
  2. 2.School of Agriculture, Food and WineUniversity of AdelaideUrrbraeAustralia
  3. 3.Department of Plant Breeding, Genetics and BiotechnologyPunjab Agricultural UniversityLudhianaIndia

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