Theoretical and Applied Genetics

, Volume 113, Issue 8, pp 1467–1480 | Cite as

Pairing and recombination at meiosis of Brassica rapa (AA) × Brassica napus (AACC) hybrids

  • M. Leflon
  • F. Eber
  • J. C. Letanneur
  • L. Chelysheva
  • O. Coriton
  • V. Huteau
  • C. D. Ryder
  • G. Barker
  • E. Jenczewski
  • A. M. Chèvre
Original Paper

Abstract

Interspecific crosses contribute significantly to plant evolution enabling gene exchanges between species. The efficiency of interspecific crosses depends on the similarity between the implicated genomes as high levels of genome similarity are required to ensure appropriate chromosome pairing and genetic recombination. Brassica napus (AACC) is an allopolyploid, resulting from natural hybridization between Brassica rapa (AA) and Brassica oleracea (CC), both being diploid species derived from a common ancestor. To study the relationships between genomes of these Brassica species, we have determined simultaneously the pairing and recombination pattern of A and C chromosomes during meiosis of AAC triploid hybrids, which result from the interspecific cross between natural B. napus and B. rapa. Different AAC triploid hybrids and their progenies have been analysed using cytogenetic, BAC-FISH, and molecular techniques. In 71% of the pollen mother cells, homologous A chromosomes paired regularly, and usually one chromosome of each pair was transmitted to the progeny. C chromosomes remained mainly univalent, but were involved in homoeologous pairing in 21.5% of the cells, and 13% of the transmitted C chromosomes were either recombined or broken. The rate of transmission of C chromosomes depended on the identity of the particular chromosome and on the way the hybrid was crossed, as the male or as the female parent, to B. napus or to B. rapa. Gene transfers in triploid hybrids are favoured between A genomes of B. rapa and B. napus, but also occur between A and C genomes though at lower rates.

Notes

Acknowledgments

Our colleagues of OUEST-Génopole® (Le Rheu, France) are gratefully acknowledged for their technical assistance. We thank B. Chalhoub and H. Belcram (URGV Evry, France) for providing PFM and the BAC 54B2, T. Ksiazczyk and J. Maluszynska (University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland) for providing a stab of BoBO14O06, R. Delourme (INRA Rennes, France) for Brassica mapping data and review of the paper, and M. Barbetti (University of Western Australia) for his critical reading of the manuscript. This work was funded by INRA, CETIOM and ANR Biodiversité.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Leflon
    • 1
  • F. Eber
    • 1
  • J. C. Letanneur
    • 1
  • L. Chelysheva
    • 2
  • O. Coriton
    • 1
  • V. Huteau
    • 1
  • C. D. Ryder
    • 3
  • G. Barker
    • 3
  • E. Jenczewski
    • 2
  • A. M. Chèvre
    • 1
  1. 1.Amélioration des Plantes et Biotechnologies VégétalesUMR INRA—AgrocampusLe Rheu CedexFrance
  2. 2.Station de Génétique et Amélioration des PlantesINRA—Institut Jean Pierre BourginVersailles CedexFrance
  3. 3.Warwick HRIWarwickEngland

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