Theoretical and Applied Genetics

, Volume 113, Issue 7, pp 1331–1345 | Cite as

Genetic control of oil content in oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.)

  • R. Delourme
  • C. Falentin
  • V. Huteau
  • V. Clouet
  • R. Horvais
  • B. Gandon
  • S. Specel
  • L. Hanneton
  • J. E. Dheu
  • M. Deschamps
  • E. Margale
  • P. Vincourt
  • M. Renard
Original Paper

Abstract

In oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) like in most oleaginous crops, seed oil content is the main qualitative determinant that confers its economic value to the harvest. Increasing seed oil content is then still an important objective in oilseed rape breeding. In the objective to get better knowledge on the genetic determinism of seed oil content, a genetic study was undertaken in two genetic backgrounds. Two populations of 445 and a 242 doubled haploids (DH) derived from the crosses “Darmor-bzh” × “Yudal” (DY) and “Rapid” × “NSL96/25” (RNSL), respectively, were genotyped and evaluated for oil content in different trials. QTL mapping in the two populations indicate that additive effects are the main factors contributing to variation in oil content. A total of 14 and 10 genomic regions were involved in seed oil content in DY and RNSL populations, respectively, of which five and two were consistently revealed across the three trials performed for each population. Most of the QTL detected were not colocalised to QTL involved in flowering time. Few epistatic QTL involved regions that carry additive QTL in one or the other population. Only one QTL located on linkage group N3 was potentially common to the two populations. The comparisons of the QTL location in this study and in the literature showed that: (i) some of the QTL were more consistently revealed across different genetic backgrounds. The QTL on N3 was revealed in all the studies and the QTL on N1, N8 and N13 were revealed in three studies out of five, (ii) some of the QTL were specific to one genetic background with potentially some original alleles, (iii) some QTL were located in homeologous regions, and (iv) some of the regions carrying QTL for oil content in oilseed rape and in Arabidopsis could be collinear. These results show the possibility to combine favourable alleles at different QTL to increase seed oil content and to use Arabidopsis genomic data to derive markers for oilseed rape QTL and identify candidate genes, as well as the interest to combine information from different segregating populations in order to build a consolidated map of QTL involved in a specific trait.

Notes

Acknowledgments

This project was supported by Génoplante, the French Consortium for Plant Genomics. We acknowledge the team of the Experimental Unit (Le Rheu, France) for performing the evaluation trials. Genotyping for INRA group was performed with the facilities of the Genotyping Platform, OUEST-genopole®. B. Chalhoub and D. Brunel are gratefully acknowledged for providing PFM and SNP markers.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Delourme
    • 1
  • C. Falentin
    • 1
  • V. Huteau
    • 1
  • V. Clouet
    • 1
  • R. Horvais
    • 1
  • B. Gandon
    • 2
  • S. Specel
    • 2
  • L. Hanneton
    • 3
  • J. E. Dheu
    • 3
  • M. Deschamps
    • 4
  • E. Margale
    • 4
  • P. Vincourt
    • 5
    • 6
  • M. Renard
    • 1
  1. 1.UMR INRA Agrocampus RennesAmélioration des Plantes et Biotechnologies VégétalesLe Rheu CedexFrance
  2. 2.Limagrain Verneuil Holding, ZAC les Portes de RiomRiom CedexFrance
  3. 3.Limagrain Verneuil Holding, Ferme de l’EtangVerneuil l’EtangFrance
  4. 4.SerasemLa Chapelle d’ArmentièresFrance
  5. 5.Euralis Semences, Domaine de SandreauMondonvilleFrance
  6. 6.Open Source BiologyLauresFrance

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